135 Ophthalmologists to Know - A-C



Maria M. Aaron, MD (Emory University, Atlanta).
Dr. Aaron is director of the ophthalmology residency program at Emory. Her clinical interests include adult comprehensive ophthalmology, particularly diabetic retinopathy and cataract surgery. She has been president of the Program Directors' Council of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, vice chair of the Ophthalmology Residency Review Committee and an associate examiner for the Oral Board Examination of the American Board of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Aaron earned her MD from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn., and completed her internship at Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta and residency in ophthalmology at Emory Eye Center. She received an Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Richard L. Abbott, MD (University of California, San Francisco). After spending two years as a young physician running a community health clinic on the Navajo reservation, Dr. Abbott decided to pursue a career in ophthalmology. Today he is a professor of ophthalmology at UCSF and current president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He has been a member of the FDA Ophthalmic Devices Panel and the National Eye Institute coordinating committee for the development of a patient assessment instrument for refractive error correction. He is research associate at the Francis I. Proctor Foundation and an emeritus director of both the American Board of Ophthalmology and the Castroviejo Cornea Society.

 

Dr. Abbott earned his MD from George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and completed his internship at Los Angeles County Hospital. He completed his ophthalmology residency at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and his fellowship in corneal and external diseases at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. He received the AAO Honor Award, Senior Honor Award and Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

David H. Abramson, MD (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York). Dr. Abramson is an ophthalmic oncologist with special interest in retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma. With a joint appointment in surgery, pediatrics and radiation oncology, he is first chief of the ophthalmic oncology service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering, the only service of its kind dedicated to ophthalmic oncology in a cancer hospital in the United States. In addition to developing novel approaches for treating retinoblastoma, he has studied second cancers in retinoblastoma, focusing on the effect of genes and the environment on the genesis of these cancers.

 

Dr. Abramson earned his MD at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and completed his ophthalmology residency and fellowship at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. He has received awards from the Alcon Research Institute, Swiss Ophthalmological Society, Association for Research in Vision and the Helen Keller Society.

 

Lloyd Paul Aiello, MD, PhD (Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston). Dr. Aiello dedicates 80 percent of his time to ophthalmology research, particularly on biochemistry and molecular mechanisms of retinal vascular disorders, such as diabetic eye disease and vascular retinal tumors. He is director of the William P. Beetham Eye Institute and head of the Section of Eye Research at the Joslin Diabetes Center. He holds an appointment at Harvard Medical School in Boston and is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology and Retina.

 

Dr. Aiello received his MD and a PhD in biochemistry from Boston University School of Medicine and completed a residency in ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. He presented the Paul Henkind Memorial Lecture at the Macula Society and was awarded the Dolly Green Scholarship from Research to Prevent Blindness, the Capps Scholarship in Diabetes from Harvard Medical School and the Alcon Award for outstanding contributions in the field of vision research.


Anthony J. Aldave, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Aldave is director of the cornea service, the refractive surgery fellowship program and the Corneal Genetics Laboratory at Jules Stein Eye Institute. His NIH-funded laboratory research focuses on the molecular genetics of the corneal dystrophies.

 

Dr. Aldave earned his MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, performed his residency in ophthalmology at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia and completed a fellowship in cornea, uveitis and refractive surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. He received the Achievement and Secretariat Awards from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and presented the Harold A. Stein Lecture to the Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists Education and Research Foundation.


Eduardo C. Alfonso, MD (Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami). Dr. Alfonso's research interests include bacterial and fungal sensitivity and the development and clinical applications of keratoprosthesis. He is director of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and chairman of the ophthalmology department of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. He has served as medical director of Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital and vice chair of its board.

 

After earning his MD from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., Dr. Alfonso completed his residency at Bascom Palmer. He undertook fellowships in corneal and external disease at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and in ophthalmic pathology at the Cogan Eye Pathology Laboratory. He received the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Honor Award and Senior Achievement Award, the South Florida Business Journal's CEO of the Year award.

 

David J. Apple, MD (Apple Laboratories, Sullivan's Island, S.C.). Dr. Apple is director of the Apple Laboratories for Ophthalmic Devices Research. He is an expert in ocular pathology, cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation and both corneal and IOL refractive surgery. He has been inducted into the Ophthalmology Hall of Fame and was selected to give the Binkhorst Lecture, Kelman Lecture and European Guest Lecture at the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress. He was previously chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Storm Eye Institute at the Medical University of South Carolina.

 

Dr. Apple earned his MD at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, served an ophthalmology residency at Louisiana State University and Charity Hospital in New Orleans and completed an ocular pathology fellowship at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. He has spent substantial research time in Germany at the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Tübingen University, Institute for Experimental Eye Research and University Eye Clinic in Munich. Note: Dr. Apple died on Aug. 18 at age 69. To learn more, click here.


Sophie J. Bakri, MD (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.). Dr. Bakri is associate professor of ophthalmology and director of the vitreoretinal surgical fellowship at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Bakri is a principal investigator on numerous multicenter clinical trials on novel drugs for retinal disease. She is editor-in-chief of the book, "Mayo Clinic on Vision and Eye Health," an editor of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, and on the editorial board of Retina, Seminars in Ophthalmology and Clinical and Surgical Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Bakri earned her MD at University of Nottingham Medical School in England and completed her residency at the Albany (N.Y.) Medical College and a vitreoretinal surgery fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. She received the Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Laurie G. Barber, MD (Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Ark.). Dr. Barber is professor of ophthalmology at the Jones Eye Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Fayetteville and chairs the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Surgical Scope Fund Committee. She was chair of the academy's OPHTHPAC and is past president of the Arkansas Ophthalmological Society.

 

Dr. Barber earned her MD from the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, completed an ophthalmology residency at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and completed mini-fellowships in ophthalmic echography at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami and in ocular pathology at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, her interests include clinical research of dry eye, blepharitis, conjunctivitis and allergy.


George B. Bartley, MD (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.). After serving as CEO of Mayo Clinic Florida and vice president for quality for Mayo Clinic nationwide, Dr. Bartley has resumed his surgical practice at Mayo Clinic Rochester. A trustee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, he has been editor-in-chief of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and on the editorial board of Ophthalmology, American Journal of Ophthalmology, and Archives of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Bartley earned his MD from the Ohio State University College of Medicine, pursued residency training in ophthalmology at Mayo Clinic and subspecialty training in ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. He focuses on oculoplastic surgery, including treatment of disorders of the eyelids, tear drainage system and orbit and eye socket.


Eliot L. Berson, MD (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston). Dr. Berson and colleagues developed the first treatment regimen for adults with typical retinitis pigmentosa. He is director of the electroretinography at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and director of its Berman-Gund Laboratory for the Study of Retinal Degenerations. His major clinical interest is in hereditary retinal degenerations, especially retinitis pigmentosa.

 

Dr. Berson earned his MD at Harvard Medical School in Boston and completed his ophthalmology residency at Barnes and MacMillan Hospital in St. Louis and a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. He is a recipient of the Award of Merit in Retina Research from the Retina Society, Franceschetti Award of the International Society for Genetic Eye Diseases, Friedenwald Award from Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, MERIT Award from the National Eye Institute, Pisart Vision Award from the New York Lighthouse International, two Alcon Research Institute awards, Llura Liggett Gund Award of the Foundation Fighting Blindness and the von Sallmann Prize from the International Society of Eye Research.


Mark S. Blumenkranz, MD (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.). Dr. Blumenkranz has been involved in translational research for several new therapies that were approved by the FDA. He is chairman of ophthalmology at Stanford University School of Medicine, with a main area of interest in vitreoretinal diseases. His research focuses on new forms of imaging, laser delivery systems, microsurgical tools and new drugs and drug delivery systems that inhibit new blood vessel growth, scarring and intraocular inflammation. He is former president of the Retina Society and an associate examiner for the American Board of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Blumenkranz earned his MD from Brown University and completed his ophthalmology residency at Stanford University Hospital and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He is a recipient of the Research to Prevent Blindness Special Manpower Award, Heed Award, Rosenthal Award in Visual Sciences, American Academy of Ophthalmology's Senior Honor and the Lifetime Achievement awards.


Thomas J. Bombardier, MD (Ambulatory Surgical Centers of America, Hanover, Mass.). Dr. Bombardier is the chief operating officer and one of the three founding principals of Ambulatory Surgical Centers of America. Before founding ASCOA, he established the largest ophthalmic practice in Western Massachusetts, two ASCs and a regional referral center. Dr. Bombardier earned his MD from Albany (N.Y.) Medical College and completed his residency at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, La.


Kraig Scot Bower, MD, (Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore). Dr. Bower is director of refractive surgery at the Wilmer Eye Institute and previously served in that role at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. A retired Army colonel, he was the Army's refractive surgery subject matter expert and managed the Army's Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program.

 

Dr. Bower earned his MD from University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Houston and completed a residency in ophthalmology at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center as well as a fellowship in cornea and external disease at UPMC. He specializes in refractive surgery, cornea and external diseases of the eye and anterior segment surgery.

 

David S. Boyer, MD (Retina-Vitreous Associates Medical Group, Beverly Hills, Calif.). Dr. Boyer has been involved in extensive clinical trials for age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis. He is a senior partner at Retina-Vitreous Associates Medical Group and holds an appointment at the University of Southern California. He has been on the advisory boards for Alcon, Novartis, Eyetech/Pfizer, Genentech, Neurotech and the Macular Degeneration Partnership. He is also a reviewer for the Archives of Ophthalmology, American Journal of Ophthalmology, Diabetes Care and Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Boyer completed an MD at Chicago Medical School, an ophthalmology residency at the USC County Medical Center and a retinal surgery fellowship at the Wills Eye Hospital. He is the recipient of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Board of Trustees Honor Award and Jules the Stein Living Tribute Award from Retinitis Pigmentosa International.


David M. Brown, MD (Retina Consultants of Houston). Dr. Brown is interested in diseases of the macula, including macular surgery, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. He is a partner in Retina Consultants of Houston and a peer reviewer for all five major ophthalmology and retina journals as well as the New England Journal of Medicine. A former president of the Houston Ophthalmological Society, he has served on the board of directors for the Greater Houston Area American Diabetes Association as well as the Gulf Coast Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

 

Dr. Brown earned his MD from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed an ophthalmology residency and retina fellowships at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. He is the recipient of the Ronald G. Michels Fellowship Award as the most outstanding retina fellow in the United States. He is an elected member of both major retina honor societies: Macula Society and Retina Society.


Alexander J. Brucker, MD (Scheie Eye Institute, Philadelphia). A successful ophthalmologic inventor, Dr. Brucker has developed surgical instruments and procedures such as scleral buckles, scleral needles, a retinal cryoprobe, the vitreous air infusion pump and a technique for draining subretinal fluid. He is professor of ophthalmology at Scheie Eye Institute at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and has served as president of the Macula Society, Retina Society and Vitreous Society.

 

Dr. Brucker earned his MD from New York Medical College. He performed an ophthalmology residency at the Friedenwald Eye Institute and a fellowship at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He is the recipient of the J. Donald M. Gass Medal from the Macula Society and the Life Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Joseph Caprioli, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Caprioli is chief of the glaucoma division, director of the glaucoma photography laboratory and glaucoma director of the ophthalmology diagnostic laboratory at Jules Stein Eye Institute. He is the glaucoma section editor for Duane's Ophthalmology and book review editor for Ophthalmic Surgery.

 

Dr. Caprioli earned his MD from SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. He performed an ophthalmology residency at Yale-New Haven (Conn.) Hospital and a fellowship in glaucoma at Wills Eye Hospital. He has won the Alcon Research Institute Award, Lewis Rudin Glaucoma Prize, Honor Award of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Wasserman Merit Award and Physician Scientist Award from Research to Prevent Blindness.

 

Keith Carter, MD (University of Iowa, Iowa City). Dr. Carter is head of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the Carver College of Medicine and the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He was director of the university's ophthalmology residency program, has been a trustee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and served as AAO meeting committee chair for ocular tumors, pathology and orbit and lacrimal plastic surgery.

 

Dr. Carter earned his MD from Indiana University, performed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Michigan and completed a fellowship in oculoplastics and orbital surgery at the University of Iowa. He specializes in oculoplastic surgery with a clinical interest in orbital inflammatory diseases, tumors and periocular reconstruction. Research interests and current projects include thyroid-related eye disease, orbital disease, anophthalmic socket reconstruction and eyelid motility.

 

David F. Chang, MD (Peninsula Eye Surgery Center, Mountain View, Calif.). Dr. Chang was the first U.S. surgeon to implant the light-adjustable artificial lens and the first dual-optic accommodating IOL. He is managing partner of the Peninsula Eye Surgery Center and is in private practice in Los Altos, Calif., focusing on cataract and intraocular lens implants. Dr. Chang has designed a number of popular cataract surgical instruments that bear his name and are used worldwide. He served as program chairman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology's annual meeting from 2004-2009.

 

Having earned an MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Chang completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a clinical professor at UCSF and has written the textbook, Mastering Refractive IOLs. Dr. Chang is president-elect of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Stanley Chang, MD (Harkness Eye Institute, New York). Dr. Chang developed several revolutionary surgical approaches to treat complicated forms of retinal detachment. He is chairman of the Harkness Eye Institute at Columbia University and on staff at Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York. He was the first to use perfluoropropane gas in the management of retinal detachment worsened by scar tissue proliferation and made a major contribution to the development of perfluorocarbon liquids for vitreoretinal surgery.

 

Dr. Chang earned his MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his residency at Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary and his fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Chang is a recipient of the 2005 Kreissig Award and the W.H. Helmerich Award from the Vitreous Society.

 

Steve Charles, MD (Charles Retina Institute, Memphis, Tenn.). Dr. Charles is a mechanical and electrical engineer who holds 103 patents or pending patents and is founder of the Charles Retina Institute. Ocular Surgery News named him one of the top ten innovators in the past 25 years. He holds appointments at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is on the editorial board of Retina and a reviewer for Ophthalmology, Archives of Ophthalmology and American Journal of Ophthalmology.

 

With an MD from the University of Miami School of Medicine, Dr. Charles completed a medical internship at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and a residency the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami, followed by a two-year clinical associate appointment at the National Eye Institute. He received the Wacker Medal from the Club Jules Gonin and the first Founders Medal from the Vitreous Society.

 

Emily Y. Chew, MD, PhD (National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Md.). Dr. Chew is deputy director of the Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications at the National Eye Institute in the National Institutes of Health. She is currently president of the Macula Society and chairs the NEI Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 and the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Eye Study. Dr. Chew has also analyzed, designed or chaired several landmark clinical trials, including the Age-Related Eye Disease Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study.

 

Dr. Chew obtained her MD from the University of Toronto and completed an ophthalmology residency there. She then completed retina fellowships at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands. The director of the medical retina fellowship program at the NEI, she is also the recipient of the Founders Award from the American Society of Retina Specialists.


Robert Cionni (Eye Institute of Utah, Salt Lake City). Dr. Cionni was one of the first surgeons in the Midwest to perform sutureless cataract surgery. He is now medical director of the Eye Institute of Utah, where he continues to design implants and new surgical techniques. His specialties include ocular injuries, traumatic cataract, congenital lens subluxation and disease-induced zonular weakness.

 

Dr. Cionni earned his MD from the University of Cincinnati. He completed an internship at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Louisville (Ky.) and a fellowship in cataract and implant surgery at Cincinnati Eye Institute.

 

Anne L. Coleman, MD, PhD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Coleman is the principal investigator of a multi-site study on the incidence of AMD in elderly women, funded by the National Eye Institute. She is director of the Jules Stein Eye Institute Mobile Eye Clinic and is a professor of ophthalmology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She is a consultant to the FDA's ophthalmic devices panel and chairs the glaucoma subcommittee of the National Eye Health Education Program of the NIH.

 

With an MD from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, Dr. Coleman completed her ophthalmology residency training at the University of Illinois at Chicago and fellowship training in glaucoma at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University. An executive editor of glaucoma for the American Journal of Ophthalmology, she focuses on glaucoma, cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

 

Stephen C. Coleman, MD (ColemanVision, Albuquerque, N.M.). Dr. Coleman is among a select few eye surgeons in the United States instructing other physicians on the use of the VISX laser system. He practices at ColemanVision, focusing on LASIK surgery, and has been part of an ongoing FDA study evaluating Wavefront technology for nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism.

 

Dr. Coleman earned his MD from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and completed advanced specialized training in eye surgery at St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center in New York. He served as a flight surgeon in the Air Force in Europe. He frequently performs eye surgeries in third-world countries and recently spent six weeks in India operating on patients at the Aravind Eye Hospital, the world's largest non-profit eye institution.

 

Scott W. Cousins, MD (Duke Eye Center, Durham, N.C.). Dr. Cousins has been developing blood tests and imaging technologies to identify patients at high risk for macular degeneration. He directs the Duke Center for Macular Diseases in the Duke Eye Center. He earned his MD from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Detroit and completed a residency in ophthalmology at Washington University in St. Louis and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He focuses on age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular diseases.

 

Alan S. Crandall, MD (University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City). For the past nine years, Dr. Crandall has traveled to Africa once a year to teach local physicians and perform free cataract and other eye surgeries. He is director of glaucoma and cataract services and senior vice chairman of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City. He is a past president of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. Dr. Crandall earned his MD from the University of Utah. He completed a surgery internship at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, an ophthalmology residency and glaucoma fellowship at the Scheie Eye Institute, both in Philadelphia.

 

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