Death rates up in 9 of 10 leading causes of death; life expectancy drops for the first time in 23 years

Life expectancy in the United States dropped for the first time since 1993, according to an article in The Washington Post.

The Post reported statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics showing death rates were up in nine of the top 10 leading causes of death. Life expectancy fell by one-tenth of a year from 2014 to 2015.

Here are the 10 leading causes of death, measured by deaths per 100,000 standard population:

1. Heart disease: 168.5, up from 167 in 2014
2. Cancer: 158.5, down from 161.2 in 2014
3. Chronic lower respiratory disease: 41.6, up from 40.5 in 2014
4. Unintentional injuries: 43.2, up from 40.5 in 2014
5. Stroke: 37.6, up from 36.5 in 2014
6. Alzheimer's disease: 29.4, up from 25.4 in 2014
7. Diabetes: 21.3, up from 20.9 in 2014
8. Influenza and pneumonia: 15.2, up from 15.1 in 2014
9. Kidney disease: 13.4, up from 13.2 in 2014
10. Suicide: 13.3, up from 13 in 2014

The total deaths went from 724.6 per 100,000 standard population in 2014 to 733.1 deaths per 100,000 standard population in 2015. Black men, white men and white women all experienced higher death rates in 2015.

The life expectancy for men was 76.3 years, down from 76.5 years in 2014. Female life expectancy dropped form 81.3 years in 2014 to 81.2 years in 2015.

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