135 Ophthalmologists to Know

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Here are profiles of 135 leading ophthalmologists in the United States.




Maria M. Aaron, MD (Emory University, Atlanta).
Dr. Aaron is director of the ophthalmology residency program at Emory. Her clinical interests include adult comprehensive ophthalmology, particularly diabetic retinopathy and cataract surgery. She has been president of the Program Directors' Council of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, vice chair of the Ophthalmology Residency Review Committee and an associate examiner for the Oral Board Examination of the American Board of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Aaron earned her MD from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn., and completed her internship at Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta and residency in ophthalmology at Emory Eye Center. She received an Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Richard L. Abbott, MD (University of California, San Francisco). After spending two years as a young physician running a community health clinic on the Navajo reservation, Dr. Abbott decided to pursue a career in ophthalmology. Today he is a professor of ophthalmology at UCSF and current president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He has been a member of the FDA Ophthalmic Devices Panel and the National Eye Institute coordinating committee for the development of a patient assessment instrument for refractive error correction. He is research associate at the Francis I. Proctor Foundation and an emeritus director of both the American Board of Ophthalmology and the Castroviejo Cornea Society.

 

Dr. Abbott earned his MD from George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and completed his internship at Los Angeles County Hospital. He completed his ophthalmology residency at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and his fellowship in corneal and external diseases at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. He received the AAO Honor Award, Senior Honor Award and Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

David H. Abramson, MD (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York). Dr. Abramson is an ophthalmic oncologist with special interest in retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma. With a joint appointment in surgery, pediatrics and radiation oncology, he is first chief of the ophthalmic oncology service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering, the only service of its kind dedicated to ophthalmic oncology in a cancer hospital in the United States. In addition to developing novel approaches for treating retinoblastoma, he has studied second cancers in retinoblastoma, focusing on the effect of genes and the environment on the genesis of these cancers.

 

Dr. Abramson earned his MD at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and completed his ophthalmology residency and fellowship at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York. He has received awards from the Alcon Research Institute, Swiss Ophthalmological Society, Association for Research in Vision and the Helen Keller Society.

 

Lloyd Paul Aiello, MD, PhD (Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston). Dr. Aiello dedicates 80 percent of his time to ophthalmology research, particularly on biochemistry and molecular mechanisms of retinal vascular disorders, such as diabetic eye disease and vascular retinal tumors. He is director of the William P. Beetham Eye Institute and head of the Section of Eye Research at the Joslin Diabetes Center. He holds an appointment at Harvard Medical School in Boston and is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology and Retina.

 

Dr. Aiello received his MD and a PhD in biochemistry from Boston University School of Medicine and completed a residency in ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. He presented the Paul Henkind Memorial Lecture at the Macula Society and was awarded the Dolly Green Scholarship from Research to Prevent Blindness, the Capps Scholarship in Diabetes from Harvard Medical School and the Alcon Award for outstanding contributions in the field of vision research.


Anthony J. Aldave, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Aldave is director of the cornea service, the refractive surgery fellowship program and the Corneal Genetics Laboratory at Jules Stein Eye Institute. His NIH-funded laboratory research focuses on the molecular genetics of the corneal dystrophies.

 

Dr. Aldave earned his MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, performed his residency in ophthalmology at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia and completed a fellowship in cornea, uveitis and refractive surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. He received the Achievement and Secretariat Awards from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and presented the Harold A. Stein Lecture to the Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists Education and Research Foundation.


Eduardo C. Alfonso, MD (Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami). Dr. Alfonso's research interests include bacterial and fungal sensitivity and the development and clinical applications of keratoprosthesis. He is director of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and chairman of the ophthalmology department of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. He has served as medical director of Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital and vice chair of its board.

 

After earning his MD from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., Dr. Alfonso completed his residency at Bascom Palmer. He undertook fellowships in corneal and external disease at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and in ophthalmic pathology at the Cogan Eye Pathology Laboratory. He received the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Honor Award and Senior Achievement Award, the South Florida Business Journal's CEO of the Year award.

 

David J. Apple, MD (Apple Laboratories, Sullivan's Island, S.C.). Dr. Apple is director of the Apple Laboratories for Ophthalmic Devices Research. He is an expert in ocular pathology, cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation and both corneal and IOL refractive surgery. He has been inducted into the Ophthalmology Hall of Fame and was selected to give the Binkhorst Lecture, Kelman Lecture and European Guest Lecture at the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress. He was previously chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at the Storm Eye Institute at the Medical University of South Carolina.

 

Dr. Apple earned his MD at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, served an ophthalmology residency at Louisiana State University and Charity Hospital in New Orleans and completed an ocular pathology fellowship at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology at Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. He has spent substantial research time in Germany at the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Tübingen University, Institute for Experimental Eye Research and University Eye Clinic in Munich. Note: Dr. Apple died on Aug. 18 at age 69. To learn more, click here.


Sophie J. Bakri, MD (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.). Dr. Bakri is associate professor of ophthalmology and director of the vitreoretinal surgical fellowship at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Bakri is a principal investigator on numerous multicenter clinical trials on novel drugs for retinal disease. She is editor-in-chief of the book, "Mayo Clinic on Vision and Eye Health," an editor of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, and on the editorial board of Retina, Seminars in Ophthalmology and Clinical and Surgical Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Bakri earned her MD at University of Nottingham Medical School in England and completed her residency at the Albany (N.Y.) Medical College and a vitreoretinal surgery fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic. She received the Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Laurie G. Barber, MD (Jones Eye Institute, Little Rock, Ark.). Dr. Barber is professor of ophthalmology at the Jones Eye Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Fayetteville and chairs the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Surgical Scope Fund Committee. She was chair of the academy's OPHTHPAC and is past president of the Arkansas Ophthalmological Society.

 

Dr. Barber earned her MD from the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, completed an ophthalmology residency at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and completed mini-fellowships in ophthalmic echography at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami and in ocular pathology at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, her interests include clinical research of dry eye, blepharitis, conjunctivitis and allergy.


George B. Bartley, MD (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.). After serving as CEO of Mayo Clinic Florida and vice president for quality for Mayo Clinic nationwide, Dr. Bartley has resumed his surgical practice at Mayo Clinic Rochester. A trustee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, he has been editor-in-chief of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and on the editorial board of Ophthalmology, American Journal of Ophthalmology, and Archives of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Bartley earned his MD from the Ohio State University College of Medicine, pursued residency training in ophthalmology at Mayo Clinic and subspecialty training in ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. He focuses on oculoplastic surgery, including treatment of disorders of the eyelids, tear drainage system and orbit and eye socket.


Eliot L. Berson, MD (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston). Dr. Berson and colleagues developed the first treatment regimen for adults with typical retinitis pigmentosa. He is director of the electroretinography at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and director of its Berman-Gund Laboratory for the Study of Retinal Degenerations. His major clinical interest is in hereditary retinal degenerations, especially retinitis pigmentosa.

 

Dr. Berson earned his MD at Harvard Medical School in Boston and completed his ophthalmology residency at Barnes and MacMillan Hospital in St. Louis and a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. He is a recipient of the Award of Merit in Retina Research from the Retina Society, Franceschetti Award of the International Society for Genetic Eye Diseases, Friedenwald Award from Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, MERIT Award from the National Eye Institute, Pisart Vision Award from the New York Lighthouse International, two Alcon Research Institute awards, Llura Liggett Gund Award of the Foundation Fighting Blindness and the von Sallmann Prize from the International Society of Eye Research.


Mark S. Blumenkranz, MD (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.). Dr. Blumenkranz has been involved in translational research for several new therapies that were approved by the FDA. He is chairman of ophthalmology at Stanford University School of Medicine, with a main area of interest in vitreoretinal diseases. His research focuses on new forms of imaging, laser delivery systems, microsurgical tools and new drugs and drug delivery systems that inhibit new blood vessel growth, scarring and intraocular inflammation. He is former president of the Retina Society and an associate examiner for the American Board of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Blumenkranz earned his MD from Brown University and completed his ophthalmology residency at Stanford University Hospital and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He is a recipient of the Research to Prevent Blindness Special Manpower Award, Heed Award, Rosenthal Award in Visual Sciences, American Academy of Ophthalmology's Senior Honor and the Lifetime Achievement awards.


Thomas J. Bombardier, MD (Ambulatory Surgical Centers of America, Hanover, Mass.). Dr. Bombardier is the chief operating officer and one of the three founding principals of Ambulatory Surgical Centers of America. Before founding ASCOA, he established the largest ophthalmic practice in Western Massachusetts, two ASCs and a regional referral center. Dr. Bombardier earned his MD from Albany (N.Y.) Medical College and completed his residency at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, La.


Kraig Scot Bower, MD, (Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore). Dr. Bower is director of refractive surgery at the Wilmer Eye Institute and previously served in that role at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. A retired Army colonel, he was the Army's refractive surgery subject matter expert and managed the Army's Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program.

 

Dr. Bower earned his MD from University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Houston and completed a residency in ophthalmology at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center as well as a fellowship in cornea and external disease at UPMC. He specializes in refractive surgery, cornea and external diseases of the eye and anterior segment surgery.

 

David S. Boyer, MD (Retina-Vitreous Associates Medical Group, Beverly Hills, Calif.). Dr. Boyer has been involved in extensive clinical trials for age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis. He is a senior partner at Retina-Vitreous Associates Medical Group and holds an appointment at the University of Southern California. He has been on the advisory boards for Alcon, Novartis, Eyetech/Pfizer, Genentech, Neurotech and the Macular Degeneration Partnership. He is also a reviewer for the Archives of Ophthalmology, American Journal of Ophthalmology, Diabetes Care and Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Boyer completed an MD at Chicago Medical School, an ophthalmology residency at the USC County Medical Center and a retinal surgery fellowship at the Wills Eye Hospital. He is the recipient of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Board of Trustees Honor Award and Jules the Stein Living Tribute Award from Retinitis Pigmentosa International.


David M. Brown, MD (Retina Consultants of Houston). Dr. Brown is interested in diseases of the macula, including macular surgery, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. He is a partner in Retina Consultants of Houston and a peer reviewer for all five major ophthalmology and retina journals as well as the New England Journal of Medicine. A former president of the Houston Ophthalmological Society, he has served on the board of directors for the Greater Houston Area American Diabetes Association as well as the Gulf Coast Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

 

Dr. Brown earned his MD from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed an ophthalmology residency and retina fellowships at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. He is the recipient of the Ronald G. Michels Fellowship Award as the most outstanding retina fellow in the United States. He is an elected member of both major retina honor societies: Macula Society and Retina Society.


Alexander J. Brucker, MD (Scheie Eye Institute, Philadelphia). A successful ophthalmologic inventor, Dr. Brucker has developed surgical instruments and procedures such as scleral buckles, scleral needles, a retinal cryoprobe, the vitreous air infusion pump and a technique for draining subretinal fluid. He is professor of ophthalmology at Scheie Eye Institute at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and has served as president of the Macula Society, Retina Society and Vitreous Society.

 

Dr. Brucker earned his MD from New York Medical College. He performed an ophthalmology residency at the Friedenwald Eye Institute and a fellowship at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He is the recipient of the J. Donald M. Gass Medal from the Macula Society and the Life Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Joseph Caprioli, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Caprioli is chief of the glaucoma division, director of the glaucoma photography laboratory and glaucoma director of the ophthalmology diagnostic laboratory at Jules Stein Eye Institute. He is the glaucoma section editor for Duane's Ophthalmology and book review editor for Ophthalmic Surgery.

 

Dr. Caprioli earned his MD from SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. He performed an ophthalmology residency at Yale-New Haven (Conn.) Hospital and a fellowship in glaucoma at Wills Eye Hospital. He has won the Alcon Research Institute Award, Lewis Rudin Glaucoma Prize, Honor Award of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Wasserman Merit Award and Physician Scientist Award from Research to Prevent Blindness.

 

Keith Carter, MD (University of Iowa, Iowa City). Dr. Carter is head of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the Carver College of Medicine and the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He was director of the university's ophthalmology residency program, has been a trustee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and served as AAO meeting committee chair for ocular tumors, pathology and orbit and lacrimal plastic surgery.

 

Dr. Carter earned his MD from Indiana University, performed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Michigan and completed a fellowship in oculoplastics and orbital surgery at the University of Iowa. He specializes in oculoplastic surgery with a clinical interest in orbital inflammatory diseases, tumors and periocular reconstruction. Research interests and current projects include thyroid-related eye disease, orbital disease, anophthalmic socket reconstruction and eyelid motility.

 

David F. Chang, MD (Peninsula Eye Surgery Center, Mountain View, Calif.). Dr. Chang was the first U.S. surgeon to implant the light-adjustable artificial lens and the first dual-optic accommodating IOL. He is managing partner of the Peninsula Eye Surgery Center and is in private practice in Los Altos, Calif., focusing on cataract and intraocular lens implants. Dr. Chang has designed a number of popular cataract surgical instruments that bear his name and are used worldwide. He served as program chairman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology's annual meeting from 2004-2009.

 

Having earned an MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Chang completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a clinical professor at UCSF and has written the textbook, Mastering Refractive IOLs. Dr. Chang is president-elect of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Stanley Chang, MD (Harkness Eye Institute, New York). Dr. Chang developed several revolutionary surgical approaches to treat complicated forms of retinal detachment. He is chairman of the Harkness Eye Institute at Columbia University and on staff at Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York. He was the first to use perfluoropropane gas in the management of retinal detachment worsened by scar tissue proliferation and made a major contribution to the development of perfluorocarbon liquids for vitreoretinal surgery.

 

Dr. Chang earned his MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his residency at Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary and his fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Chang is a recipient of the 2005 Kreissig Award and the W.H. Helmerich Award from the Vitreous Society.

 

Steve Charles, MD (Charles Retina Institute, Memphis, Tenn.). Dr. Charles is a mechanical and electrical engineer who holds 103 patents or pending patents and is founder of the Charles Retina Institute. Ocular Surgery News named him one of the top ten innovators in the past 25 years. He holds appointments at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is on the editorial board of Retina and a reviewer for Ophthalmology, Archives of Ophthalmology and American Journal of Ophthalmology.

 

With an MD from the University of Miami School of Medicine, Dr. Charles completed a medical internship at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami and a residency the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami, followed by a two-year clinical associate appointment at the National Eye Institute. He received the Wacker Medal from the Club Jules Gonin and the first Founders Medal from the Vitreous Society.

 

Emily Y. Chew, MD, PhD (National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Md.). Dr. Chew is deputy director of the Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications at the National Eye Institute in the National Institutes of Health. She is currently president of the Macula Society and chairs the NEI Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 and the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Eye Study. Dr. Chew has also analyzed, designed or chaired several landmark clinical trials, including the Age-Related Eye Disease Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study.

 

Dr. Chew obtained her MD from the University of Toronto and completed an ophthalmology residency there. She then completed retina fellowships at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands. The director of the medical retina fellowship program at the NEI, she is also the recipient of the Founders Award from the American Society of Retina Specialists.


Robert Cionni (Eye Institute of Utah, Salt Lake City). Dr. Cionni was one of the first surgeons in the Midwest to perform sutureless cataract surgery. He is now medical director of the Eye Institute of Utah, where he continues to design implants and new surgical techniques. His specialties include ocular injuries, traumatic cataract, congenital lens subluxation and disease-induced zonular weakness.

 

Dr. Cionni earned his MD from the University of Cincinnati. He completed an internship at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Louisville (Ky.) and a fellowship in cataract and implant surgery at Cincinnati Eye Institute.

 

Anne L. Coleman, MD, PhD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Coleman is the principal investigator of a multi-site study on the incidence of AMD in elderly women, funded by the National Eye Institute. She is director of the Jules Stein Eye Institute Mobile Eye Clinic and is a professor of ophthalmology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. She is a consultant to the FDA's ophthalmic devices panel and chairs the glaucoma subcommittee of the National Eye Health Education Program of the NIH.

 

With an MD from the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, Dr. Coleman completed her ophthalmology residency training at the University of Illinois at Chicago and fellowship training in glaucoma at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University. An executive editor of glaucoma for the American Journal of Ophthalmology, she focuses on glaucoma, cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

 

Stephen C. Coleman, MD (ColemanVision, Albuquerque, N.M.). Dr. Coleman is among a select few eye surgeons in the United States instructing other physicians on the use of the VISX laser system. He practices at ColemanVision, focusing on LASIK surgery, and has been part of an ongoing FDA study evaluating Wavefront technology for nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism.

 

Dr. Coleman earned his MD from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and completed advanced specialized training in eye surgery at St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center in New York. He served as a flight surgeon in the Air Force in Europe. He frequently performs eye surgeries in third-world countries and recently spent six weeks in India operating on patients at the Aravind Eye Hospital, the world's largest non-profit eye institution.

 

Scott W. Cousins, MD (Duke Eye Center, Durham, N.C.). Dr. Cousins has been developing blood tests and imaging technologies to identify patients at high risk for macular degeneration. He directs the Duke Center for Macular Diseases in the Duke Eye Center. He earned his MD from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Detroit and completed a residency in ophthalmology at Washington University in St. Louis and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He focuses on age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular diseases.

 

Alan S. Crandall, MD (University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City). For the past nine years, Dr. Crandall has traveled to Africa once a year to teach local physicians and perform free cataract and other eye surgeries. He is director of glaucoma and cataract services and senior vice chairman of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City. He is a past president of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. Dr. Crandall earned his MD from the University of Utah. He completed a surgery internship at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, an ophthalmology residency and glaucoma fellowship at the Scheie Eye Institute, both in Philadelphia.

 



Donald J. D'Amico, MD (New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York). An internationally recognized leader in the field of vitreoretinal surgery, Dr. D'Amico is ophthalmologist-in-chief at New York Presbyterian Hospital and chairman of Ophthalmology at Weill Cornell Medical College, both in New York. His major interests include vitreoretinal surgery, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, experimental lasers and other technologies for the surgical treatment of vitreoretinal disorders such as retinal detachment, macular holes and epiretinal membranes and endophthalmitis and intravitreal drug therapy.

 

Dr. D'Amico earned his MD from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago. He completed an ophthalmology residency at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston and a fellowship in vitreoretinal diseases at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. A recipient of the Honor Award and the Senior Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology, he serves on the board of four major journals, is past president of the Retina Society and serves on the executive committee of Club Jules Gonin.


Elizabeth A. Davis, MD (Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis). Dr. Davis was an early investigator in phakic IOLs for myopia. She is medical director of the surgery center at Minnesota Eye Consultants and holds an appointment at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. She is chair of the refractive committee of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, sits on the editorial board for several journals and has edited six textbooks.

 

With an MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, Dr. Davis completed a cardiac surgery residency at Johns Hopkins before switching to ophthalmology and completing a fellowship in immunology research at Johns Hopkins. She is the recipient of the Franklin Paine Mall Prize in anatomy, Hewlett-Packard Top Medical Graduate Award, Janet M. Glasgow Memorial Award and William Stewart Halsted Award in surgery.

 

James A. Davison, MD (Wolfe Eye Clinic, Marshalltown, Iowa). Dr. Davison started the vitrectomy surgery service at Wolfe Eye Clinic. He is chair of the practice management committee of American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of ASCRS. Dr. Davison received his MD from Mayo Clinic Medical School in Rochester, Minn. He completed his ophthalmology internship at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California and an ophthalmology residency at Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. He is recipient of the Surgicus Golden Hands Award from Surgicus III.


Susan H. Day, MD (California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco). Dr. Day chairs the ophthalmology department and is residency program director at California Pacific Medical Center. She is a past president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and has chaired the Residency Review Committee for Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Day earned her MD from Louisiana State University, completed her residency at California Pacific Medical Center and underwent her fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in London. She has authored more than 40 peer-reviewed articles and papers and has served on boards of directors and committees for the AAO, American Board of Ophthalmology, American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Women in Ophthalmology and the Ophthalmic Mutual Insurance Company.

 

Steven J. Dell, MD (Texan Eye, Austin). Dr. Dell is the inventor of the Dell Astigmatism Marker, Dell Fixation Ring and Dell PlumeSafe Ophthalmic Evacuation System and Handpiece. He is director of Refractive and corneal surgery for Texan Eye, which focuses on cataract and LASIK surgery. Dr. Dell is an award-winning lecturer, textbook author and editor. He has performed more than 20,000 surgical procedures and conducted research on the latest advances in eye surgery, often serving as an investigator for FDA-sponsored studies.

 

Dr. Dell earned his MD from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed his residency in ophthalmology at Tulane University in New Orleans. The physician-readers of the medical journal Cataract and Refractive Surgery Today chose him one of the top 50 opinion leaders in cataract and refractive surgery.

 

Joseph L. Demer, MD, PhD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Demer is a pioneer in the use of imaging to understand strabismus and double vision about the neuroanatomy of the eye socket. He is chief of pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus division and director of the Ocular Motility Laboratory at the Jules Stein Eye Institute.

 

With an MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Dr. Demer completed an ophthalmology residency at the Cullen Eye Institute and a fellowship in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston. His research interests include brain-eye coordination in vision. He is principal investigator for clinical trials in biomechanical analysis in strabismus surgery and neuroanatomy of amblyopia.

 

Uday Devgan, MD (Devgen Eye Surgery, Los Angeles). Dr. Devgan has a special interest in cataract, refractive lens implant and LASIK surgery. In addition to his private practice, he holds an appointment at the Jules Stein Eye Institute at the UCLA School of Medicine and is chief of ophthalmology at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center. He earned his MD at the USC School of Medicine and trained at the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA, where he won awards for outstanding achievement and research.

 

Eric D. Donnenfeld, MD (LASIK Long Island, Rockville Centre, N.Y.). Dr. Donnenfeld was one of the original investigators of the excimer laser. He has performed among the most refractive surgeries and has trained a large number of surgeons to perform refractive surgery. He designed and patented four instruments for refractive surgery use.

 

Dr. Donnenfeld received an MD from Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, N.H. He completed his ophthalmology residency at Manhattan Eye Ear & Throat Hospital and his fellowship in anterior segment & refractive surgery and cornea and external disease at Wills Eye Hospital. He was chosen as the 2005 National Cataract and Refractive Surgeon of the Year by Cataract and Refractive Surgery Today.

 

Pravin U. Dugel, MD (Retinal Consultants of Arizona, Phoenix). Dr. Dugel was co-investigator in National Eye Institute research studies and in several multicenter studies. He is managing partner of Retinal Consultants of Arizona and founding member of Spectra Eye Institute in Sun City, Ariz. Dr. Dugel has authored more than 30 papers and book chapters and is the first person to receive both the Heed Foundation and the Ronald G. Michels Vitreo-Retinal Surgery Fellowship awards.

 

Dr. Dugel earned his MD from UCLA School of Medicine. He completed his ophthalmology residency and a fellowship in vitreo-retinal surgery at the Doheny Eye Institute at USC School of Medicine. He completed another fellowship in vitreoretinal diseases at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami.

 

Daniel S. Durrie, MD (Durrie Vision, Overland Park, Kan.). Dr. Durrie is founder of Durrie Vision, specializing in LASIK and cataract surgery and one of the few centers in the country to conduct FDA clinical trials. He serves is clinical professor and director of refractive surgery services at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Lawrence.

 

Dr. Durrie earned his MD and completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln and completed a Corneal Fellowship with Filkins Eye Institute in Omaha. Dr. Durrie has given the prestigious Distinguished Lans Lectureship at the International Society of Refractive Surgery and has been a Barraquer Lecturer at the International Society of Refractive Surgery.

 

Harry W. Flynn Jr., MD (Miller School of Medicine, Miami). Dr. Flynn has edited or co-edited four books including Diabetes and Ocular Diseases: Past, Current, and Future Therapies and Vitreoretinal Disease: The Essentials. He is chair in ophthalmology at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami and has a special interest in diabetic retinopathy and complications of cataract surgery. Dr. Flynn has authored or co-authored more than 300 publications as well as 53 book chapters.

 

Having earned an MD from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville, Dr. Flynn completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Virginia Hospital and a retina fellowship in at Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco. He is a recipient of the Shaler Richardson, MD, Service to Medicine Award from the Florida Society of Ophthalmology.

 

Richard K. Forster, MD (Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami). Dr. Forster specializes in corneal diseases, corneal transplant surgery, anterior segment reconstruction and secondary intraocular lenses. He is chair in corneal and external ocular diseases at the Miller School of Medicine in Miami. He earned his MD at Boston University School of Medicine and completed an ophthalmology residency at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami and a fellowship in corneal and external diseases at the Francis I. Proctor Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology in San Francisco. He was guest of honor at the American Academy of Ophthalmology's 2011 meeting.


Gary Foster, MD (Eye Center of Northern Colorado, Ft. Collins). Dr. Foster was one of the first in the Rocky Mountains to adapt Lasik, perform femtosecond cataract surgery and to implant premium intraocular lenses. He is a physician trainer for the VISX laser system and is frequently teaches advanced surgical techniques at meetings of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons. He also moderates the comprehensive list serve for Eye Connect, a website where ophthalmologists can post challenging questions on their field.

 

Dr. Foster has been a principle investigator in numerous research projects and has several patents in process. Having earned an MD from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Dr. Foster completed an ophthalmology residency at the Moran Eye Center in Salt Lake City where he learned cataract and refractive surgery, scoring in the top one percent nationally of all board certifying ophthalmologists. He has chaired the National Comprehensive Clinical Committee and currently serves on the National Cataract Committee for ASCRS.


K. Bailey Freund, MD (Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York). Dr. Freund is an expert in rare conditions that have been difficult for other specialists to diagnose. He holds an appointment at New York University School of Medicine and is on staff at New York Presbyterian Hospital, Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital and Lenox Hill Hospital, all in New York. His chief interests are retinal disorders including macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular and inflammatory diseases. He recently authored a guide for macular degeneration patients and their families, using narration and animation to explain diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

 

Having earned his MD from New York University School of Medicine, Dr. Freund completed an ophthalmology residency and a fellowship in medical and surgical retina at the Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital. He has been elected to the American Society of Retina Specialists, Macula Society and Retina Society.


David S. Friedman, MD (Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore). Dr. Friedman undertakes eye-care development projects in China and other countries for Helen Keller International in New York. He is director of the glaucoma fellowship program at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Glaucoma Preferred Practice Patterns Panel, co-chairman of the World Glaucoma Association Research Committee and chairman of the American Glaucoma Society Practice Guidelines Subcommittee. He is also on the editorial board of Ophthalmology and Journal of Glaucoma.

 

Dr. Friedman earned his MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston, completed his ophthalmology residency at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia and his glaucoma training at the Wilmer Eye Institute.

 

James Gills, MD (St. Luke's Cataract & Laser Institute, Tampa, Fla.). Dr. Gills was one of the first eye surgeons in the United States to dedicate his practice to cataract treatment through the use of intraocular lenses. The founder and director of St. Luke's Cataract & Laser Institute, he was a front-runner in adopting intraocular antibiotics to prevent post-surgical infection, no-stitch cataract surgery and intraocular medicines to reduce inflammation and to prevent needles for anesthesia.

 

Dr. Gills earned his MD from Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., and served his ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He is the recipient of the Philip M. Corby Memorial Award, Innovator's Award from the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and the Visionary Award from the Foundation Fighting Blindness.

 

David B. Glasser, MD (Patapsco Eye MDs, Columbia, Md.). Dr. Glasser holds privileges at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia, Md., and works at the hospital's ambulatory surgery center. He s the current president of the Cornea Society. Dr. Glasser earned his MD for Albany (N.Y.) Medical College, completed his internship at Albany Medical Center Hospitals, his ophthalmology residency at Jules Stein Eye Institute in Los Angeles and fellowships in cornea and external disease and corneal physiology at Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He has received the R. Townley Paton Award from the Eyebank Association of America.


David S. Greenfield, MD (Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami). Dr. Greenfield is the recipient of a National Eye Institute consortium grant studying advanced imaging technology in glaucoma. He is director of the glaucoma fellowship program at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Dr. Greenfield has served as chair of the AAO glaucoma subspecialty day committee and chair of the bylaws and strategic planning committee of the American Glaucoma Society, as well as vice chair of the society's Scientific Program Committee.

 

Having earned an MD from the New York University School of Medicine in New York, Dr. Greenfield completed his residency at the New England Eye Center at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston and completed a fellowship in glaucoma and a fellowship in neuro-ophthalmology at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He has received the AAO's Achievement Award and is a reviewer for the American Journal of Ophthalmology, Journal of Glaucoma, Ophthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging and International Glaucoma Review.



 

Barrett G. Haik, MD (University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn.). Dr. Haik is chair of the ophthalmology department at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine. During his tenure, he has transformed the department from with fewer than ten academic faculty members into the Hamilton Eye Institute, with more than 40 academic faculty members. He is immediate past president of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology and was president of the American Eye Study Club and American Society of Ophthalmic Ultrasound.

 

Dr. Haik received an MD from Louisiana State University in New Orleans and completed an ophthalmology residency at the Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. In addition to winning the American Academy of Ophthalmology's service and honor awards, he presented the Inaugural Edwards Lecture at the University of South Florida and the Coleman Lecture at Cornell University Medical College in New York.


Julia A. Haller, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Haller is ophthalmologist-in-chief of the Wills Eye Institute and professor and chair of the department of ophthalmology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. She is past president of the American Society of Retina Specialists and serves on the editorial boards of RETINA, Retinal Physician, Ocular Surgery News, Ophthalmology Times and Evidence-Based Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Haller earned her MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston and was an ophthalmology resident and a retina fellow at Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore. Dr. Haller has published over 250 papers in the peer-reviewed literature as well as 20 book chapters.


Sadeer B. Hannush, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Langhorne, Pa.). Dr. Hannush is an attending surgeon on the cornea service at Wills Eye Institute and holds an appointment at Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He is chair of the scientific program at the Cornea Society and served on the FDA's ophthalmic drug and devices panels. His interests are full and partial thickness corneal transplantation, complex cataract and anterior segment reconstructive procedures including permanent keratoprosthesis and laser vision correction.

 

With an MD from Wayne State University in Detroit, Dr. Hannush completed his ophthalmology residency at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and his fellowship in corneal and refractive surgery at Emory University. He received the American Academy of Ophthalmology Honor Award and was given the Excellence in Teaching Award by Wills Eye Hospital residents. He serves as medical director of the Lions Eye Bank of Delaware Valley in Philadelphia.

 

Seenu M. Hariprasad, MD (University of Chicago). Dr. Hariprasad is co-founder of the CONNECT Network, a collaborative association of academic vitreoretinal specialists. He is chief of the vitreoretinal service, director of ophthalmic clinical research and director of the surgical retina fellowship program at the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago. He has been principal investigator or sub-investigator in more than 30 national clinical trials evaluating new drugs, devices, surgical innovations and drug delivery for age-related macular degeneration, retinal vascular occlusion, endophthalmitis and diabetic retinopathy.

 

Dr. Hariprasad earned his MD from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his ophthalmology residency at the Cullen Eye Institute in Houston and his fellowship in the diseases and surgery of the retina, macula, and vitreous at Washington University's Barnes Retina Institute in St. Louis. He is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, Retinal Physician and EyeTube.net and is a scientific referee for six other ophthalmology journals.

 

Jeff Heier, MD (Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston). Dr. Heier is an advisor or consultant to more than 20 biotechnical or pharmaceutical companies and is on the protocol committee of the National Eye Institute's AREDS 2 study. A partner at Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston and co-director of its vitreoretinal fellowship, he holds appointments at Tufts School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School in Boston. A former president of the Center for Eye Research and Education Foundation, he has been secretary of online education and e-learning for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. His specialty is retinal diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and venous occlusive disease.

 

Dr. Heier received his MD from Boston University and then he served in a combat support hospital in the Persian Gulf War, where he was awarded the Bronze Star and an Army Commendation Medal. He completed an ophthalmology residency at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston. Dr. Heier is the recipient of the Honor Award and Senior Honor Award from the American Society of Retina Specialists and American Academy of Ophthalmology's Honor Award.


Bonnie Henderson, MD (Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston). Dr. Henderson has been principal investigator for the development of a computer software program simulating surgery for training purposes. She is one of 26 ophthalmologists at Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, which cares for more than 150,000 patients each year in all categories of eye disorders and visual system diseases. She holds an appointment at Harvard Medical School in Boston and is author of Essentials of Cataract Surgery.

 

Primarily known as an educator, she created and organized the annual Harvard Intensive Cataract Surgical Training Course, which focuses on teaching surgery to ophthalmology residents. Dr. Henderson earned her MD from Dartmouth Medical School in Hanover, N.H., and completed her residency at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary at Harvard.


Allen C. Ho, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Ho is a member of the FDA Ophthalmic Device Panel and a principal investigator of several clinical trials at Wills, where he is a professor of ophthalmology and a vitreoretinal surgeon. Dr. Ho is editor-in-chief of Current Opinion in Ophthalmology, on the editorial boards of several other ophthalmic publications and also serves on scientific advisory boards at Alcon, Genentech, Novartis and Eyetech.

 

Dr. Ho earned his MD from Columbia (Mo.) University and completed his ophthalmology residency at Wills Eye Hospital and retina fellowship at Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital. His expertise is in new treatments and clinical trials for diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, macular diseases, diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment.

 

Edward J. Holland, MD (Cincinnati Eye Institute). Dr. Holland is president of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons and has served on the ASCRS executive committee. He is the director of cornea services at the Cincinnati Eye Institute and a professor of ophthalmology at the University of Cincinnati, where his focuses is corneal conditions, stem cell transplantation, corneal transplantation, cataract surgery, ocular surface transplantation and refractive surgery.

 

With an MD from the Loyola-Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, Dr. Holland trained in ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. He completed a fellowship in cornea and external disease at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and a second fellowship in ocular immunology at the National Eye Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Holland won the Binkhorst Award from the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and edited the textbook Cornea.

 

Gary N. Holland, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Holland was among the first to describe the ophthalmic manifestations of AIDS. He is director of the Ocular Inflammatory Disease Center and the Clinical Research Center at Jules Stein Eye Institute and is chief of the cornea-external ocular disease and uveitis division in the ophthalmology department at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Dr. Holland is a past president of the American Uveitis Society and has served as associate editor of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

 

Having earned an MD and completed a residency at the UCLA School of Medicine, he completed fellowships in uveitis and external ocular diseases at the University of California, San Francisco, and in corneal diseases and surgery at Emory University in Atlanta. He has presented the LX Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture and was awarded the Jane Wyman Humanitarian Award by the Southern California chapter of the Arthritis Foundation for his work on children with uveitis.


Mark Humayun, MD, PhD (Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Humayun leads a consortium of engineers and scientists from more than 10 national laboratories and universities who are refining the Argus artificial retina, commercialized by Second Sight Medical Products. An associate director of research at Doheny Eye Institute at the University of Southern California, he developed the retinal chip, restoring partial sight to those who have been blinded by retinitis pigmentosa.

 

With an MD from Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., Dr. Humayun completed his internship at Roanoke (Va.) Memorial Hospital and fellowships in retinovascular surgery and vitreoretinal surgery at the Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore. He is among the only ophthalmologist elected to both the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Award of Merit in Retina Research from the Retina Society.

 

Mark W. Johnson, MD (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor). Dr. Johnson is director of the retina service at the University of Michigan. He has been a member of the update and special focus course committee and the basic and clinical science course committee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and has served as associate examiner for the American Board of Ophthalmology. He has also served on the board of the American Society of Retina Specialists and Retina Society.

 

Dr. Johnson earned his MD at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City. He completed his residency training at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center and completed fellowships in medical retina and vitreoretinal surgery at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. He serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, Retina and Retinal Physician, and has received the honor and senior achievement awards of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Randolph L. Johnston, MD (Cheyenne Eye Clinic, Cheyenne, Wyo.). A third-generation ophthalmologist, Dr. Johnston is past president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He is in private practice at Cheyenne Eye Clinic, a consultant to the Cheyenne VA and holds appointments with the University of Wyoming Family Practice Program and the University of Utah department of ophthalmology in Salt Lake City.

 

Dr. Johnston received his MD and his residency training at the University of Utah College of Medicine and completed his fellowship in diseases and surgery of the retina and vitreous at University of Pennsylvania's Scheie Eye Institute in Philadelphia. He won the AAO's Senior Achievement Award, chaired the Academy's OPHTHPAC committee and coordinated EyeMD for the academy's Laser Surgery Initiative.

 

Albert S. Jun, MD, PhD (Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore). Dr. Jun researches corneal diseases such as keratoconus using molecular biology and genetic techniques. He is associate professor of ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and co-director of the Wilmer Openshaw Keratoconus Research Group. He also specializes in Fuchs dystrophy, refractive surgery, cataract and external eye diseases.

 

Dr. Jun earned both his MD and PhD from Emory University in Atlanta and completed an ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute. He also completed a fellowship in cornea, external diseases and corneal gene therapy at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. He received the Maumenee Clinician Scientist Award at Wilmer and received grants and awards from the National Institutes of Health, Heed Ophthalmic Foundation, Eye Bank Association of America and Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology.

 

L. Jay Katz, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Katz is director of the glaucoma service at Wills Eye Institute and professor of ophthalmology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, authored three books on ophthalmologic surgery and participated in collaborative studies at the National Eye Institute.

 

Dr. Katz earned an MD and completed a residency at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., and performed a glaucoma fellowship at the Wills Eye Institute. He is a recipient of the Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

John H. Kempen, MD, PhD (Scheie Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Kempen was vice chair of the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment Trial and is founding director of the ocular inflammation service and ophthalmic epidemiology at the Scheie Eye Institute at the University of Pennsylvania. He helped coordinate the Eye Diseases Prevalence Research Group, which serves as a referral center for the management of ocular inflammatory diseases in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and nearby states.

 

Having earned an MD from the University of California, San Diego, Dr. Kempen then earned a PhD in epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in Baltimore. He completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Washington in Seattle and a fellowship in uveitis and clinical immunology at the Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore. He is senior scholar in the University of Pennsylvania Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics in Philadelphia.

 

Terry Kim, MD (Duke University Health System, Durham, N.C.). Dr. Kim is associate director of cornea and refractive surgery services at Duke Health and chair of the cornea clinical committee at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. He earned his MD from Duke University School of Medicine, performed his residency in ophthalmology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and his fellowship in cornea and refractive surgery at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. His clinical interests are corneal transplantation, PK, DSEK, cataract surgery, the multifocal intraocular lens, ReSTOR, laser refractive surgery, LASIK, LASEK, PRK, thin-flap LASIK, IntraLASIK, Intralase, femtosecond laser, phakic intraocular lens, Verisys and Visian ICL.

 

Douglas D. Koch, MD (Baylor Vision, Houston). Dr. Koch is medical director of Baylor Vision at Baylor College of Medicine and professor of ophthalmology at the Cullen Eye Institute at Baylor. He is past president of the International Intra-Ocular Implant Club and the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, as well as a charter member of the executive committee of the Refractive Surgery Interest Group of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Koch earned an MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston. He completed his residency at Baylor College of Medicine and fellowship training in London, Los Angeles and Seattle. He is editor of the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Paul S. Koch, MD (Koch Eye Associates, Warwick, R.I.). Dr. Koch was one of the first physicians in America to practice refractive surgery, one of the first to use phakic lens implants and one of the first to use accommodating lens implants to correct presbyopia. He is the founder and medical director of Koch Eye Associates and he has written seven textbooks on eye surgery, six of which are on cataract surgery and one on corneal refractive surgery. He is medical editor emeritus of Ophthalmology Management Magazine.

 

Dr. Koch earned an MD from Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston and completed an ophthalmology residency at Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital. He has been awarded the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Honor Award, the David Kelman Foundation's Golden Hands Award, Cataract and Refractive Surgery Today's Nordan Award, the Irish-American Ophthalmology Society's Top-Gun Phaco Award and the Hoffer Award.

 

Colman Kraff, MD (Kraff Eye Institute, Chicago). Dr. Kraff was the first refractive eye surgeon in the Midwest to perform LASIK and is one of three primary excimer laser trainers in the United States. He is a member of the Kraff Eye Institute and was principal investigator for eight FDA studies for laser manufacturers as well as co-investigator for four more studies. In addition to his work as reviewer for the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, he has written more than five textbook chapters.

 

With an MD from Rush Medical College in Chicago, Dr. Kraff completed his ophthalmology residency and his fellowship in cornea and external disease at the University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary. Dr. Kraff is an attending physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and holds a teaching appointment at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago.

 

Ronald R. Krueger, MD (Cleveland Clinic). Dr. Krueger is co-medical lead for the concept OptoQuest, a Cleveland Clinic spin-off company. He is a co-editor of the first book on Wavefront customized LASIK surgery and was a founding organizer of the first conference on Wavefront. The medical director of the department of refractive surgery at Cole Eye Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Krueger has served as board member of the International Society of Refractive Surgeons before it merged with the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Krueger received his MD from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He performed his residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York, a fellowship in cornea and refractive surgery at the University of Southern California Medical Center and a fellowship in cornea and external disease at University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Oklahoma City. He has received the American Academy of Ophthalmology senior achievement award and has been associate editor for the Journal of Refractive Surgery.

 

Brent Lambert, MD (Ambulatory Surgical Centers of America, Hanover, Mass.). Dr. Lambert is chairman of the board and a founder of Ambulatory Surgical Centers of America. He is currently responsible for business development at ASCOA. Prior to founding ASCOA, Dr. Lambert developed and owned three ASCs, including one of the first eye ASCs in the Northeast. He earned his MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed his residency at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston.

 

Stephen S. Lane, MD (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). Dr. Lane was one of the original clinical investigators for the FDA trial examining the use of the excimer laser. He is clinical professor of ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota. His expertise is in cornea and external disease, anterior segment surgery and refractive surgery. In addition to his practice at Associated Eye Care in Minneapolis, he has participated in more than 20 national clinical trials in cataract and refractive surgery.

 

Dr. Lane earned his MD from the University of Minnesota, completed an ophthalmology residency at Pennsylvania State University in University Park and spent a fellowship in cornea and external disease and refractive surgery at the University of Minnesota. He was president of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Paul Daniel Langer, MD (UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark). Dr. Langer is chief of the division of ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery and director of the residency program at the Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School. He also serves as co-chair of the ophthalmology committee at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

 

Dr. Langer earned his MD from John Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, performed an ophthalmology residency at the University of California at San Francisco, completed and a fellowship in ophthalmic plastic, orbital and reconstructive surgery at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He was a visiting fellow in the adnexal service at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. His research interests include diplopia and ocular trauma.


Andrew G. Lee, MD (Methodist Hospital, Houston). Dr. Lee is chair of the department of ophthalmology at the Methodist Hospital. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Academic Ophthalmology. His specialties include neuro-ophthalmology, optic nerve disorders and optic nerve tumors.

 

With an MD from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Dr. Lee completed his residency in ophthalmology at Cullen Eye Institute in Houston, his fellowship in neuro-ophthalmology at Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore and a postdoctoral research fellowship in neuropathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He received the Achievement Award and the Secretariat Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and was the 2001 recipient of the Charles Phelps Memorial Award for Research and Education.


Jerome H. Levy, MD (New York Eye Surgery Center, Bronx). Dr. Levy is a leading expert in cataract removal and no-stitch surgery and was among the first surgeons to perform phacoemulsification more than 25 years ago. He is co-founder, president and surgeon director of both New York Eye Surgery Center and the Ambulatory Surgery Center of Greater New York. He is an attending surgeon at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York and the Ambulatory Surgery Center of Greater New York and past president and board member of the Outpatient Ophthalmic Surgery Society.

 

He earned his MD from SUNY Downstate Medical Center and completed his residency in ophthalmology at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital. His specialized training includes phacoemulsification surgery with intraocular lens implantation, laser surgery, treatment of glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy.

 

Paul R. Lichter, MD (Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Mich.). Dr. Lichter is chair of the department of ophthalmology and visual sciences and director of the Kellogg Eye Center at the University of Michigan. He is past president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, past chair of the American Board of Ophthalmology and past editor-in-chief of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Lichter received his MD from the University of Michigan, took his ophthalmology residency at the Kellogg Eye Center and completed his fellowship in glaucoma at University of California, San Francisco. He has been secretary-general of Academia Ophthalmologica Internationalis, director of Heed Ophthalmic Foundation and chairman of the Society of Heed Fellows.

 

Thomas J. Liesegang, MD (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla.). Dr. Liesegang is a professor of ophthalmology at Mayo Clinic Florida. He has practiced at the Mayo Clinic for 28 years, first in Rochester, Minn. Dr. Liesegang has been chair of the American Academy of Ophthalmology's ophthalmic clinical education committee and CME committee. He serves on the International Council of Ophthalmology's Task Force on Ophthalmology Continuing Education and is a director of the Pan American Association of Ophthalmologists.

 

Dr. Liesegang earned an MD from New York University in New York, completed a residency at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami and a fellowship in external ocular disease and corneal surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He has served as editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Ophthalmology and editor of Transactions of the American Ophthalmological Society.

 

Richard L. Lindstrom, MD (Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis). Dr. Lindstrom has developed a number of solutions, intraocular lenses and instruments. He is founder and attending surgeon at Minnesota Eye Consultants and is chief medical editor for Ocular Surgery News and medical director of TLC Vision, Sightpath Medical and Refractec. He spent 10 years on the active faculty at University of Minnesota in the department of ophthalmology in Minneapolis.

 

Dr. Lindstrom received his MD and completed his residency in ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota. He completed fellowships in anterior segment surgery at Mary Shiels Hospital in Dallas and in glaucoma at University Hospital in Salt Lake City. His awards include the Lans Distinguished Award for innovative research in refractive surgery, Barraquer Award, and the first lifetime achievement award from the International Society of Refractive Surgery.


 

Parag A. Majmudar, MD (Chicago Cornea Consultants). Dr. Majmudar has served as American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting committee chair for refractive surgery and optics, refraction contact lenses and is on the international council of the International Society of Refractive Surgery. He has private practices in Chicago, Hoffman Estates and Highland Park, Ill., specializing in laser and non-laser vision correction procedures, cataract surgery and complications stemming from refractive surgery. He is associate professor of ophthalmology at Rush University in Chicago and was co-director of the corneal fellowship at Rush.

 

With an MD from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, now part of Drexel College of Medicine, Dr. Majmudar completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of Chicago and his subspecialty fellowship in cornea and external diseases and refractive surgery at Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center. He recently received the AAO's Achievement Award.


Robert K. Maloney, MD (Maloney Vision Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Maloney was among the first surgeon on the West Coast to perform LASIK surgery as part of the original FDA clinical trials. He is director of the Maloney Vision Institute and has trained more than 700 surgeons for the excimer laser. He has personally performed more than 40,000 vision-correction surgeries. In addition to an appointment at UCLA, he has appeared frequently on TV as the exclusive LASIK surgeon for the ABC series "Extreme Makeover."

 

A former Rhodes scholar and summa cum laude graduate of Harvard University in Boston, Dr. Maloney completed his education at Oxford University and Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He is currently clinical professor of ophthalmology at UCLA. He has published more than 100 articles, abstracts and reports in professional journals and has delivered more than 200 invited lectures.


Richard Mackool, MD (Mackool Eye Institute, Astoria, N.Y.). Dr. Mackool developed the first combined microsurgical system for performing both phacoemulsification and either posterior or anterior segment vitrectomy. The founder of the Mackool Eye Institute, he performed one of the first human implantation of an acrylica intraocular lens.

 

Dr. Mackool designed the Mackool Phacoemulsification System, which features dual infusion sleeve technology permitting surgical procedures made through non-leaking incisions while reducing the risk of thermal injury to surrounding tissues. He earned an MD from Boston University and completed an internship at University of Southern California Medical Center and a residency at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.


Mark J. Mannis, MD (UC Davis Health System, Sacramento, Calif.). Dr. Mannis' research includes development of experimental antimicrobial agents and growth factors that affect the corneal wound healing rate, skin diseases that affect the eye and outcomes of corneal transplants and artificial corneas. He is chair of ophthalmology at UC Davis Health System Eye Center and past president of the Cornea Society.

 

Having earned an MD from the University of Florida College of Medicine in Gainesville, Dr. Mannis performed an ophthalmology residency at Washington University in St. Louis and a fellowship in cornea and external eye disease at University of Iowa in Iowa City. Having authored more than 125 publications and five books on topics relating to corneal surgery and disease, he specializes in corneal transplantation and external diseases of the eye.

 

Steven L. Mansberger, MD, MPH (Devers Eye Institute, Portland, Ore.). Dr. Mansberger is director of ophthalmic clinical trials for the Devers Eye Institute and director of glaucoma services at the Veterans Hospital. He holds appointments at Oregon Health Science University and has research grant support as principal investigator from the National Eye Institute, CDC and American Glaucoma Society. He is on the editorial board for Journal of Glaucoma and American Journal of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Mansberger completed his MD at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, an ophthalmology residency at Shiley Eye Center at the University of California, San Diego, and a glaucoma fellowship at Devers Eye Institute. He has received a Heed Fellowship and the American Glaucoma Society Clinician-Scientist award.

 

Samuel Masket, MD (Advanced Vision Care, Los Angeles). Dr. Masket is author of the Atlas of Cataract Surgery, an overview of the current state of cataract and related surgery. He is a partner in Advanced Vision Care and clinical professor of ophthalmology at UCLA's Jules Stein Eye Institute. He chaired the cataract special interest committee of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and was on the board of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Masket earned an MD from New York Medical College in New York and performed an internship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, a residency at New York Medical College and a fellowship at the Harkness Eye Institute of Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals and is the consultation section editor of the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Peter J. McDonnell, MD (Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore). Dr. McDonnell is director of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a leader in corneal transplantation, laser refractive surgery and treating dry eye. His research interests include the causes and correction of refractive error, corneal wound healing and microbial keratitis.

 

Dr. McDonnell received his MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and completed an ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute. He also completed a fellowship in cornea and external disease at the Doheny Eye Institute at the University of Southern California. He is the chief medical editor of Ophthalmology Times and has served as an HHS consultant.

 

Aaron M. Miller, MD (Houston Eye Associates). Dr. Miller is editor-in-chief of Eye Wiki, an ophthalmic wiki with content written by ophthalmologists. A member of Houston Eye Associates, Dr. Miller emphasizes patient communication. He strives to answer any question that may arise during the visit. Research projects include the study of retinopathy of prematurity and pediatric orbital infections.

 

Dr. Miller earned his MD at Texas Tech University in Lubbock where he also received an MBA in health organization management. He completed his ophthalmology residency at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and received fellowship training in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston.

 

Joan W. Miller, MD (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston). Dr. Miller was the first woman to be named a full professor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School in Boston. She is now chief and chair of the department of ophthalmology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary at Harvard. Dr. Miller's clinical interests include diseases and surgery of the retina and vitreous, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and photodynamic therapy. Her research interests involve neuroprotection and ocular neovascularization, particularly as it relates to macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

 

Dr. Miller earned her MD at Harvard Medical School and performed her residency and her fellowship at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. She has received the Rosenthal Award of the Macula Society, the Retina Research Award from Club Jules Gonin and the Alcon Research Institute Award. Dr. Miller joined the board of Alcon in May 2009.

 

Kevin M. Miller, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Miller works with industry to bring products to market in the area of intraocular lenses and ophthalmic optics. He is comprehensive ophthalmology division chief at the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA and holds his own humanitarian device exemption from the FDA to implant Morcher artificial iris segments in eyes with congenital or acquired iris defects.

 

With an MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Dr. Miller completed a residency in ophthalmology at Jules Stein Eye Institute and a fellowship in ophthalmic optics at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. He is the recipient of the Paul Vicari Endowed Cataract Research Fund at UCLA and a Senior Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Dr. Miller's clinical practice focuses on cataract and refractive surgery and the rehabilitation of eyes with complex anterior segment problems.

 

Richard P. Mills, MD, MPH (University of Washington, Seattle). Dr. Mills is in a private glaucoma practice and holds an appointment at the University of Washington. He is editor of Eye Net, a publication of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, and chairs the steering committee for EyeCare America at AAO.

 

Dr. Mills earned his MD from Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., and completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Washington. He also completed a glaucoma fellowship at the University of British Columbia. He has served as a director of the American Board of Ophthalmology, delegate to the American Board of Medical Specialties and vice chair for the Residency Review Committee for Ophthalmology at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.


Bartly Mondino, MD (Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Mondino is chairman of the UCLA Department of Ophthalmology and director of the Jules Stein Eye Institute. He is executive vice president of the Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology and on the medical advisory board of the Braille Institute in Los Angeles.

 

Dr. Mondino earned his MD from Stanford (Calif.) University School of Medicine. He completed an ophthalmology residency at New York Hospital-Cornell University Medical Center in New York and a fellowship in cornea and external disease at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. With a focus on inflammatory and infectious eye diseases, he has published extensively on autoimmune diseases of the external eye and corneal ulcers related to contact lenses.

 

Timothy Murray (Bascom Palmer, Miami). Dr. Murray is an expert in treating eye cancer in children. He is director of the Ocular Oncology Service at Bascom Palmer and holds an appointment at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. His research interests include ocular oncology, with a focus on combined modality focal therapies, tumor responses to periocular chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Dr. Murray earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. He completed an ophthalmology residency at University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco and retinal and vitreoretinal fellowships at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.


Peter A. Netland, MD, PhD (University of Virginia, Charlottesville). Dr. Netland has published five textbooks, most recently Pediatric Glaucomas and the second edition of Glaucoma Medical Therapy. He is chairman of the ophthalmology department at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. With research interests primarily in the pharmacologic effects and surgical techniques in glaucoma, he is an active clinician caring for glaucoma patients.

 

Dr. Netland earned his MD at the University of California, San Francisco, and his PhD at Harvard University in Boston. He then undertook an ophthalmology residency and a glaucoma fellowship at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. He is the recipient of the Achievement Award and the Senior Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


Timothy W. Olsen, MD (Emory Eye Center, Atlanta). Dr. Olsen collaborates with mechanical engineers at Georgia Tech in Atlanta for the development of new surgical instrumentation to address advanced AMD. His research team has described novel methods of drug delivery, such as the suprachoroidal route using small microcannulae. Dr. Olsen is director of the Emory Eye Center and is on the board of the Emory Clinic. He holds leadership positions in the Macula Society, American Ophthalmologic Society, American Academy of Ophthalmology and Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

 

Having earned an MD from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Dr. Olsen completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Emory University. He serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, and Ocular Surgery News.

 

Randall J. Olson, MD (Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City). Dr. Olson has been researching intra-ocular lens complications, teleophthalmology and corneal transplantation techniques. He is CEO of the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, an ophthalmology professor at the University of Utah and author of more than 300 professional publications. Having earned his MD at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Dr. Olson completed a residency at Jules Stein Eye Institute in Los Angeles and fellowships at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, University of Florida in Gainesville and Louisiana State University Eye Center in New Orleans.

 

James C. Orcutt, MD, PhD (University of Washington, Seattle). Dr. Orcutt chairs the American Board of Ophthalmology and has interests in neuro-ophthalmology, orbital disease and oculoplastic surgery. He is a professor of ophthalmology and adjunct professor of otolaryngology, head and neck surgery at University of Washington. He has done research in teleretinal imaging for diabetic eye disease and has developed a national registry for tracing soldiers with ocular injuries.

 

Dr. Orcutt earned his MD from University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver. He completed an ophthalmology residency at University of Washington, a neuro-ophthalmology and orbital surgery fellowship at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London and a pediatric neuro-ophthalmology fellowship at the Hospital for Sick Children in London.


Robert H. Osher, MD (Cincinnati Eye Institute). Focusing on cataract and implant surgery, Dr. Osher has designed many of the contemporary intraocular lenses and instruments used in cataract surgery. He is professor of ophthalmology at University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and has been the ophthalmic consultant for the Cincinnati Reds since 1990. Dr. Osher has co-authored five books on cataract and implant surgery and is editor of the Video Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery, Video Textbook of Viscosurgery and International Advances in Phacoemulsification.

 

With an MD from University of Rochester (N.Y.) Medical School, Dr. Osher was a resident at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami. He completed fellowships in Miami and at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. He won the 2009 Innovator award from the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Mark Packer, MD (Drs. Fine, Hoffman & Packer, Eugene, Ore.). Dr. Packer works with the ophthalmic industry on the development of new technology for cataract and refractive surgery. He is in private practice with Drs. Fine, Hoffman & Packer and holds an appointment at Oregon Health & Sciences University in Portland. He serves as consultant to Abbott Medical Optics, Advanced Vision Science, General Electric Company, Rayner Intraocular Lenses, Transcend Medical, TrueVision Systems, Visiogen and WaveTec Vision Systems.

 

Dr. Packer has been on the cataract clinical committee of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and a medical monitor for the FDA study of the aspheric Tecnis Multifocal Intraocular Lens. After graduating from Harvard University in Boston, he spent six years researching traditional Chinese and alternative medicine before earning an MD at the University of California at Davis and completing an ophthalmology residency at Boston University Medical Center.

 

Kirk Packo, MD (Illinois Retina Associates, Chicago). Dr. Packo has invented more than 25 surgical instruments, holds two U.S. patents and collaborated on the development of the artificial silicon retina. In addition to being a partner in of Illinois Retina Associates, Dr. Packo chairman of the ophthalmology department and the retina section at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and cofounder of Rush's vitreoretinal fellowship. He also founded the journal Retina Times and has produced over 20 award-winning medical films.

 

The roots of Dr. Packo's career go back to childhood. With a father who was a professional photographer, he was fascinated with cameras and all things visual. He earned his MD at St. Louis University and completed an ophthalmology residency at University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary in Chicago as well as a fellowship at Emory University in Atlanta. He is the recipient of the Senior Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Relja Zivojnovic Award from the European Vitreous Society and Founders Award from the American Society of Retina Specialists.


Larry E. Patterson, MD (Eye Centers of Tennessee, Crossville). Dr. Patterson has done extensive medical mission work in Central America and the South Pacific, and is chief medical editor of Ophthalmology Management magazine. He is medical director of the Eye Centers of Tennessee and the Cataract and Laser Center and past president of the Outpatient Ophthalmic Surgery Society. Dr. Patterson built and operated a multispecialty surgery center in 1998 and an ophthalmic surgery center in 2002. He earned his MD from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and completed his ophthalmology residency there as well.


Jay S. Pepose, MD, PhD (Pepose Vision Institute, Chesterfield, Mo.).
Dr. Pepose is director of Pepose Vision Institute, director of the Midwest Cornea Foundation and holds an appointment at Washington University in St. Louis. He is a subspecialist in refractive surgery, cornea and external diseases and is an editor of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Pepose earned a PhD in microbiology and immunology and his MD at UCLA. He completed residency training at the Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore and fellowship training at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He is the recipient of the Cogan Award from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and the Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 


 

Jean E. Ramsey, MD, MPH (Boston University Eye Associates). Dr. Ramsey has developed specialty clinics for adults with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. She holds an appointment at Boston University School of Medicine and directs the ophthalmology residency program at Boston Medical Center. She specializes in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus.

 

Dr. Ramsey has served on the board of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and chaired its council and is a member of its Strategic Assessment Planning Task Force and Committee for State Organizational Development. She earned her MD from Boston University School of Medicine and completed her ophthalmology residency and pediatric fellowship at Tufts New England Medical Center in Boston.

 

J. Bradley Randleman, MD (Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta). Dr. Randleman is associate professor of ophthalmology at Emory University School of Medicine and is director of the Emory Corneal Fellowship program. He is editor of the Journal of Refractive Surgery and associate editor for the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

 

Dr. Randleman earned his MD degree from Texas Tech University in Lubbock and completed his residency and a fellowship in cornea and external disease and refractive surgery at Emory University. He holds the Claes Dohlman Society Award for excellence in cornea and refractive surgery training, Secretariat Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Binkhorst Young Ophthalmologist Award from the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. He was also awarded the ASCRS Foundation Research Grant for his work on LASIK procedures.

 

Christopher J. Rapuano, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Rapuano was instrumental in reintroducing refractive surgery to Wills Eye Institute. He is co-director of the cornea service and the refractive surgery department at Wills and professor of ophthalmology at Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. As a resident, he co-authored a best-selling textbook in ophthalmology, Wills Eye Institute Manual. He recently published the LASIK Handbook — A Case-Based Approach.

 

With an MD from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York
City, Dr. Rapuano completed a residency at Wills Eye Institute and a fellowship at University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics in Iowa City. He focuses on corneal diseases with special interest in refractive surgery.


Philip J. Rosenfeld, MD (Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami). Dr. Rosenfeld pioneered the use of Avastin, the first drug that actually reverses vision loss for patients with age-related macular degeneration. He is professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and is principal investigator for nine prospective studies investigating pharmacotherapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

 

Having earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Dr. Rosenfeld completed an ophthalmology residency at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He gave the 2009 J. Donald M. Gass Award lecture at the Retina Society and the David and Mary Seslen Award lecture at the Barnes Retina Institute, based in St. Louis. In 2006, he won the Florida Society of Ophthalmology's Shaler Richardson Service to Medicine Award.

 

Stephen J. Ryan, MD (Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles). The founding president of the National Alliance for Eye and Vision Research, Dr. Ryan is president of Doheny Eye Institute, affiliated with the University of Southern California, and has authored or edited nine books and more than 270 peer-reviewed articles. Dr. Ryan received his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. He completed his ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. He previously served as dean of the Keck School of Medicine at USC and is a recipient of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Senior Honor Award.

 

Thomas W. Samuelson, MD (Minnesota Eye Consultants, Minneapolis). Dr. Samuelson is founding partner and attending surgeon of Minnesota Eye Consultants and holds an appointment at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. He is chair of glaucoma clinical committee at ASCRS and past chairman of the medical staff at the Phillips Eye Institute in Minneapolis. Dr. Samuelson is an examiner for the American Board of Ophthalmology and past president of the International Society of Spaeth Fellows. He serves on the Basic Clinical Science Course Committee for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Samuelson completed his MD at the University of Minnesota, residency at the University of South Florida and his sub-specialty training at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. He is the recipient of the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Senior Achievement Award and is the glaucoma section editor for Ocular Surgery News.


Andrew P. Schachat, MD (Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland). Dr. Schachat is vice chairman of clinical affairs and director of clinical research at the Cole Eye Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. He has served on many committees with the American Academy of Ophthalmology, including the Bylaws and Rules committee, Outcomes Program committee and Basic and Clinical Science Course committee.

 

Dr. Schachat earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and completed his ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. His additional training includes a retina and oncology fellowship at the Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. He is editor-in-chief of Ophthalmology and former associate editor of the Archives of Ophthalmology. He served on the EyeNet editorial advisory board and is a current editor of two volumes of Ryan's Retina, fourth edition.


Carol Shields, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Shields is involved in numerous research projects centered on tumors of the conjunctiva, eyelids, orbit and intraocular areas. She is associate director of the oncology service at Wills and holds an appointment at Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. She has been writing recently on conjunctival melanoma, conjunctival nevi and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. In the area of intraocular tumors, her main focus is on choroidal melanoma, choroidal metastasis and retinoblastoma.

 

Dr. Shields earned an MD from University of Pittsburgh and completed an ophthalmology residency and an ocular pathology fellowship at Wills Eye Hospital. She has co-authored several textbooks on intraocular tumors mainly with her husband, Jerry Shields, MD, and has published an atlas on conjunctival tumors, eyelid tumors, intraocular tumors and orbital tumors.


Jerry Shields, MD (Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia). Dr. Shields established the ocular oncology service at Wills in 1974. He is director of the oncology service at Wills and holds an appointment at Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. With a main interest in choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma, he pioneered new therapies and was instrumental in popularizing plaque radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma to save the patient's eye. He is former president of the International Society of Ocular Oncology.

 

Having earned an MD from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Dr. Shields completed an ophthalmology residency and a vitreoretinal surgery fellowship at Wills Eye Hospital as well as an ophthalmology pathology fellowship at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. He has published numerous textbooks and chapters on ocular tumors, many with his wife, Carol Shields, MD.


Bradford J. Shingleton, MD (Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston). A glaucoma and cataract specialist with Ophthalmic Consultants, Dr. Shingleton has performed among the most cataract, glaucoma and laser operations in New England. He holds an appointment at Harvard Medical School in Boston and was president of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery from 2008-2009. An avid sports fan, he is team ophthalmologist for the Boston Bruins, Boston Red Sox, New England Patriots and the New England Revolution.

 

With an MD from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Dr. Shingleton completed a residency and a fellowship at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston. He co-authored two major textbooks and published more than100 scientific medical articles and chapters.

 

Carla J. Siegfried, MD (Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis). Dr. Siegfried is associate professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at Washington University School of Medicine. She is AAO meeting chair for glaucoma and ad hoc reviewer for the American Journal of Ophthalmology and Journal of Glaucoma. After earning an MD from the University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, she completed an ophthalmology residency at University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary and a glaucoma fellowship at Northwestern University, both in Chicago. Her specialty areas are glaucoma and general ophthalmology.


Stephen G. Slade, MD (Slade & Baker Vision Center, Houston). Dr. Slade was among the first surgeons in the United States to perform LASIK. A partner in Slade & Baker, he was also among first in the United States to implant the Crystalens, a phacoemulsification lens for presbyopia, and is among the most experienced physicians with INTRALASE, a "bladeless" Lasik. Dr. Slade has directed LASIK training of more than 8,000 other refractive surgeons worldwide.

 

Dr. Slade earned an MD from University of Texas School of Medicine at the Texas Medical Center in Houston. He completed a residency in ophthalmology in New Orleans and a fellowship in corneal surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He is a recipient of the Barraquer Award, a top award in the field of refractive surgery, in 2007.

 

Ronald E. Smith, MD (University of Southern California, Los Angeles). Dr. Smith is chairman of the ophthalmology department at the University of Southern California. He served as president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and was the AAO's chair of the Lifelong Education for the Ophthalmologist Planning Committee and the Master Plan for Education Committee. He was also national project director of the Elimination of Preventable Blindness from Diabetes by the Year 2000.

 

Dr. Smith earned his MD from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and completed a residency at Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute in Baltimore and a fellowship at Francis I. Proctor Foundation University of California, San Francisco. His clinical interests include cornea, uveitis and corneal transplant and his research activities are in dry eye and eye inflammation.

 

Kerry Solomon, MD (Carolina Eyecare Physicians, Charleston, S.C.). Dr. Solomon is the first director of the Carolina Eyecare Research Institute at Carolina Eyecare Physicians and is chair of the FDA liaison committee for the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. He was director of cataract, refractive and cornea services at Storm Eye Institute, medical director of the Magill Vision Center and director of the Magill Research Center, all in Charleston.

 

Dr. Solomon earned his MD from the University of Vermont College of Medicine in Burlington and completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington. He completed fellowships in ophthalmic pathology at University of Utah Health Sciences Center in Salt Lake City and in cataract and refractive surgery and corneal transplantation at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He is a recipient of the Lee Nordan Refractive Surgeon of the Year Award.


Richard F. Spaide, MD (Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York, New York). Dr. Spaide has developed numerous surgical instruments that were named after him. He was involved in developing combined photodynamic therapy and intravitreal triamcinolone for age-related macular degeneration. His current research interests include development of autofluorescent photography of the eye using a fundus camera.

 

Dr. Spaide earned an MD from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He completed an ophthalmology residency at St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center of New York and a vitreous and retina fellowship Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital. He is the recipient of the Richard and Hilda Rosenthal Foundation Award in the Visual Sciences, is a section editor of Retina and is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.


Walter J. Stark, MD (Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore). Dr. Stark is director of the Stark-Mosher Center for Cataract and Corneal Diseases of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. He is also medical director of the Medical Eye Bank of Maryland, former chairman of the Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the FDA and former associate editor of Archives of Ophthalmology.

 

With an MD from the University of Oklahoma School of Medicine in Oklahoma City, Dr. Stark completed his residency in ophthalmology at Wilmer Eye Institute. He is a recipient of the honor, senior honor and life achievement awards of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and received a special FDA citation for expert and precedent-setting medical and scientific ophthalmic device advice.

 

Roger F. Steinert, MD (UC Irvine Ophthalmology Group, Irvine, Calif.). Dr. Steinert was involved in the first stage of excimer laser refractive surgery and LASIK development. While a visiting scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, his laboratory group was the second in the world to begin studying the applications of the excimer laser in 1983. He was among the first group of surgeons in FDA trials of phototherapeutic keratectomy and photorefractive keratectomy.

 

Dr. Steinert earned an MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston and completed an ophthalmology residency at Harvard-Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He chairs the program committee of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and received the Barraquer Award, the most prestigious honor in refractive surgery, in 2008.

 

Paul Sternberg Jr., MD (Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Nashville, Tenn.). Dr. Sternberg is chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is member of the board of trustees of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He chaired the NIH Study Section on Retinal and Choroidal Diseases and is a reviewer for the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Sternberg received his MD from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and completed his ophthalmology residency at the Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Duke University Eye Center in Durham, N.C. He holds the AAO Senior Honor Award, Vitreous Society honor award, Heed Ophthalmic Foundation Award, Lew R. Wasserman Award of Merit from Research to Prevent Blindness and the Sommer Prize for research in macular degeneration.

 

Edwin M. Stone, MD, PhD (University of Iowa, Iowa City). Dr. Stone is director of the Carver Family Center for Macular Degeneration at the University of Iowa. He specializes in molecular genetics of inherited eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, hereditary glaucoma, autosomal dominant RPE dystrophies, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy and hereditary corneal dystrophies.

 

Dr. Stone earned his MD from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed a residency in ophthalmology and a fellowship in vitreoretinal surgery at the University of Iowa. He has received the Doyne Medal, Gregg Medal, Cogan Award, Rosenthal Award, the Lewis Rudin Glaucoma Prize, Alcon Research Institute Award and Wasserman Award.

 

R. Doyle Stulting, MD, PhD (Woolfson Eye Institute, Atlanta). Dr. Stulting is director of Corneal Disease and Research at Woolfson Eye Institute. An immediate past president of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, he served as a member of the FDA Ophthalmic Devices Panel for 10 years and chaired that panel for three years. He has served as editor-in-chief of the journal Cornea and as a board member of the Eye Bank Association of America.

 

With an MD and PhD from Duke University in Durham, N.C., Dr. Stulting was an ophthalmology resident at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami and a fellow in cornea and external disease at Emory University in Atlanta. He received the FDA's citation for Excellence, Commitment and Outstanding Service in Protecting the Public Health, Paton Award from Eyebank Association of America and the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Lifetime Achievement Award.

 


 

William S. Tasman, MD (Mid Atlantic Retina, Philadelphia). While serving in the U.S. Air Force in Germany, Dr. Tasman worked with Professor Meyer-Schwickerath at the University of Bonn, who was developing the xenon arc photocoagulator for treating diabetic retinopathy. Dr. Tasman founded Mid Atlantic Retina, which is affiliated with Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. Aside from retinopathy of prematurity, Dr. Tasman has had a strong interest in other pediatric vitreoretinal conditions, such as Stickler's syndrome. He has been president of the Retina Society and American Board of Ophthalmology.

 

Dr. Tasman received his MD from Temple University Medical School in Philadelphia. After two years in the Air Force, he completed a residency at Wills Eye Hospital and a vitreoretinal fellowship in Boston. He has given several named lectureships and has received numerous awards, including the Zentmayer Award, Heed Award, Jules Stein Lifetime Achievement Award, Howe Medal of the American Ophthalmological Society, Award of Merit in Retina Research from the Retina Society and Honor Award, Senior Honor Award, Lifetime Achievement Award and Distinguished Service Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


John T. Thompson, MD (Retina Specialists, Towson, Md.). In addition to his practice at Retina Specialists, Dr. Thompson holds appointments at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and the University of Maryland in College Park. He has served as vice president of the American Society of Retina Specialists and president of the Maryland Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Thompson earned his MD from Johns Hopkins Medical School and completed an ophthalmology residency and surgical and medical retina specialty training at the Wilmer Institute in Baltimore. He has been American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting chairman for retina, vitreous and intraocular inflammation and uveitis.


Richard Tipperman, MD (Ophthalmic Partners of Pennsylvania, Bala Cynwyd). Dr. Tipperman is part of Ophthalmic Partners of Pennsylvania, specializing in refractive surgery, cataract surgery and management of complications of cataract surgery. He has authored numerous publications and twice won the Best Paper of Session award at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting. Dr. Tipperman received his MD from the University of Rochester (N.Y.) School of Medicine and Dentistry. He was a general surgery resident at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, a neurosurgery resident at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and chief resident in ophthalmology at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia.

 

Michael T. Trese, MD (Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Mich.). Dr. Trese is an expert in retinopathy of prematurity and pediatric retinal disease.  In addition to being a partner of Associated Retinal Consultants, he currently is Clinical Professor of Biomedical Sciences at The Eye Research Institute of Oakland University (Rochester, MI), and Clinical Associate Professor at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit. He is also chief of Pediatric and Adult Vitreoretinal Surgery at William Beaumont Hospital, based in Royal Oak, Mich.  A former president of the Retina Society, Dr. Trese has participated in trials sponsored by the National Institute of Health and National Eye Institute. Having earned his MD from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., he completed an ophthalmology residency at Jules Stein Eye Institute in Los Angeles and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Duke University in Durham, N.C.


Russell N. Van Gelder, MD, PhD (University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle). Dr. Van Gelder chairs the ophthalmology department at the University of Washington School of Medicine and director of UW Medicine Eye Institute. He has been president of the American Uveitis Society and chair of the commercial relations committee of Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He is a reviewer for the American Journal of Ophthalmology, associate editor of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, and serves on the editorial boards of IOVS, Journal of Biological Rhythms and Molecular Vision.

 

Dr. Van Gelder received his MD and a PhD in neuroscience from Stanford (Calif.) University. He completed his ophthalmology residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and a uveitis and medical retinal disease fellowship at Washington University and the Barnes Retina Institute, all in St. Louis. He is a recipient of the National Eye Institute's K08 Clinician-Scientist Award, the Research to Prevent Blindness Career Development Award and a NARSAD Young Investigator Award.

 

Woodford Van Meter, MD (University of Kentucky, Lexington). Dr. Van Meter directs the Cornea and External Disease Service at the University of Kentucky School of Medicine and is a consultant for the Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the CDC. He currently serves as president of the Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons.

 

Dr. Van Meter earned his MD from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. He completed an ophthalmology residency at Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minn., and cornea and external disease fellowship at Emory University Clinic in Atlanta. He is the recipient of the R. Townley Paton Award from the Eye Bank Association of America, Castroviejo Cornea Society Award, Honor Award and Senior Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


Rohit Varma, MD, MPH (Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles). Dr. Varma has received among the top amount in grant funding from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health. He is director of the glaucoma service, ocular epidemiology center and clinical trials at Doheny Eye Institute at the University of Southern California.

 

Dr. Varma received his MD from Maulana Azad Medical College at the University of Delhi, India. He completed an ophthalmology residency at Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore and fellowships at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia and the Doheny Eye Institute. He is the principal investigator of the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study, Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Diseases Study and Chinese American Eye Study.

 

George A. Violin, MD (Medical Eye Care Associates, Norwood, Mass.). Dr. Violin was one of the early investigators of epikeratophakia, a precursor of LASIK technology. He is the founder of Medical Eye Care Associates and devotes most of his practice to cataract surgery, LASIK and related surgeries. He is one of the three founding principals of the Ambulatory Surgery Centers of America and is affiliated with Caritas Norwood (Mass.) Hospital, Faulkner/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and New England Medical Center, all in Boston. He earned his MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and completed his ophthalmic residency at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.


John A. Vukich, MD (Davis Duehr Dean Center for Refractive Surgery, Madison, Wis.). Dr. Vukich twice served as program chairman of the largest refractive surgery meeting in the world, the ISRS/AAO Refractive Surgery Subspecialty Day. He is the surgical director of Davis Duehr Dean Center, holds an appointment at the University of Wisconsin Medical School in Milwaukee and is an associate editor of the Journal of Refractive Surgery. Dr. Vukich earned his MD from Emory University in Atlanta and completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary in Chicago.


R. Bruce Wallace III, MD (Wallace Eye Surgery Center, Alexandria, La.). Dr. Wallace is the founder and medical director of Wallace Eye Surgery Center. He holds appointments at LSU Medical School and Tulane School of Medicine, both in New Orleans. The current president of the Outpatient Ophthalmic Surgery Society, he has been AAO meeting chair for cataract and president of the Society for Excellence in Eyecare and American College of Eye Surgeons.

 

Dr. Wallace earned his MD and performed his ophthalmology residency at Tulane School of Medicine. He serves on the editorial board of Ocular Surgery News, Ophthalmology Management, EyeWorld, Review of Ophthalmology, Refractive EyeCare, Advanced Ocular Therapy and Cataract and Refractive Surgery Today.

 

Robert S. Weinberg, MD (Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore). Dr. Weinberg chairs the department of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and is associate professor of ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. A specialist in corneal and external diseases of the eye, uveitis and ocular manifestations of systemic disease, he previously served as director of the cornea service at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond.

 

Dr. Weinberg received his MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary in Chicago and a corneal, external disease, and uveitis fellowship at the Francis Proctor Foundation at the University of California in San Francisco.


Robert N. Weinreb, MD (Hamilton Glaucoma Center, San Diego). Dr. Weinreb is chairman of the department of ophthalmology, director of the Shiley Eye Center and director of the Hamilton Glaucoma Center, known for its cross-disciplinary investigative programs. He has served as president of the American Glaucoma Society, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, World Glaucoma Association and Foundation of the American Glaucoma Society. He has written or edited more than 22 books, including Essentials in Ophthalmology, and serves on 31 editorial boards.

 

With an MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Weinreb completed his residency and fellowship training at the University of California, San Francisco. He has trained more than 100 post-doctoral fellows in glaucoma, many of whom hold distinguished academic positions throughout the world.

 

Jon-Marc Weston, MD (Weston Eye Center, Roseburg, Ore.). Dr. Weston introduced the now standard "no needle, no stitch" cataract procedure to Southern Oregon and was among the first in the Pacific Northwest to use endoscopic laser for glaucoma and multi-focal lens implants. In addition to his practice at Weston Eye Center, he founded Vision Surgery & Laser Center and Oregon Laser Eye Center. He is secretary of the Outpatient Ophthalmic Surgery Society.

 

Dr. Weston earned his MD and completed his eye surgery training at Hahnemann University in Philadelphia. He received the Helen Keller Benefactors award and Melvin Jones Fellowship as part of his efforts to restore vision through Lions Club International.

 

Charles P. Wilkinson, MD (Greater Baltimore Medical Center). Dr. Wilkinson is chairman of the ophthalmology department at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He is past president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and chaired its preferred practice patterns retina panel. He also was chair of the American Board of Ophthalmology and the FDA Ophthalmic Devices Panel.

 

Dr. Wilkinson received his MD from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, was a resident at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He also undertook a vitreoretinal fellowship at the University of Miami. He has received the AAO's Honor, Senior Honor and Life Achievement Honor Awards and was a guest of honor at the Academy's 2011 meeting. Research interests include retinal detachment, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration.

 

George Williams, MD (William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Mich.). Dr. Williams has a special interest in advanced vitreoretinal surgery for complex retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy. The chair of ophthalmology at William Beaumont Hospital, he is also director of the Beaumont Eye Institute, holds an appointment at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine in Rochester, Mich., and is a partner with Associated Retinal Consultants. He is currently the principal investigator of several research trials sponsored by the National Eye Institute and the pharmaceutical industry.

 

Having earned his MD at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Dr. Williams completed a residency in ophthalmology and a fellowship in vitreoretinal surgery at the Eye Institute of the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He is a recipient of the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Special Recognition Award, Secretariat Award and Senior Achievement Award and is a past president of the Vitreous Society, now the American Society of Retinal Specialists.


Ruth D. Williams, MD (Wheaton Eye Clinic, Wheaton, Ill.). A glaucoma consultant and partner at the Wheaton Eye Clinic, Dr. Williams serves on the executive committee of this practice of 26 ophthalmologists. She is president-elect of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and serves on the academy's board of trustees.

 

Dr. Williams received her MD from Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center. She completed a residency in ophthalmology at the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and a fellowship in glaucoma at the University of California San Francisco. She led the Ophthalmology Section Council of the AMA for nearly a decade, is an associate examiner for the American Board of Ophthalmology and has served on the board of Women in Ophthalmology.

 

M. Edward Wilson Jr., MD (Albert Florens Storm Eye Institute, Charleston, S.C.). Dr. Wilson chairs the pediatric committee of ASCRS and was pediatric issues consultant to the FDA Ophthalmic Devices Panel. He is director of the Albert Florens Storm Eye Institute and chairman of the department of ophthalmology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Dr. Wilson serves on the board of the South Carolina Society of Ophthalmology and has been president of the Costenbader Society, a pediatric ophthalmology group. He is an executive editor of the American Journal of Ophthalmology and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

 

Dr. Wilson earned his MD from the Medical University of South Carolina and performed an ophthalmology residency at the National Naval Medical Center and a fellowship in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus with Marshall Parks, MD. He received a senior honor award from the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus and a senior achievement award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.


Lawrence A. Yannuzzi, MD (Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital, New York). Dr. Yannuzzi is a pioneer in angiography, having helped coin the term "idiopathic polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy" for a particular type of hemorrhagic maculopathy. He is vice chairman and director of the Retinal Research Center of the Manhattan Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital and founder and president of the Macula Foundation. He holds an appointment at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York.

 

Having earned an MD for Boston University School of Medicine, Dr. Yannuzzi completed a residency in ophthalmology at the New York Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital. He is a recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and is on the board of Lighthouse International.


Terri L. Young, MD (Duke Eye Center, Durham, N.C.). Dr. Young is professor of ophthalmology and pediatrics at Duke Eye Center. She is the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting chair for pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus. Dr. Young earned her MD from Harvard Medical School in Boston and completed an ophthalmology residency at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and a fellowship in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She has received honor awards from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

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