Why do these 15 states have so few ASCs?

Marcus Robertson - Print  |

With the COVID-19 pandemic ushering in many changes to the healthcare industry, leaders need to recognize emerging patterns to identify areas primed for growth.

In figures recently released by Becker's ASC Review, nine states plus the District of Columbia were found to have fewer than one ASC per 100,000 residents — and the next five states hardly fared better.

Some, such as fifth-fewest New York and sixth-fewest Massachusetts, likely come as a surprise.

So, why do these states have so few ASCs? The following trends may shed some light:

 

Note: States are listed from fewest to most ASCs per capita.

State**

ASCs

ASCs per (100k) capita

Poverty rate

CON law

Active surgeons*

Surgeons* per (100k) capita

Vermont

2

0.31

9%

Y

130

20.22

District of Columbia

3

0.44

14.6%

Y

260

37.71

West Virginia

8

0.45

14.6%

Y

900

50.18

Virginia

61

0.71

8.8%

Y

850

9.85

New York

147

0.73

11.8%

Y

2,960

14.65

Massachusetts

54

0.77

8.2%

Y

1,860

26.46

Kentucky

35

0.78

14.4%

Y

400

8.88

Alabama

41

0.82

14.6%

Y

430

8.56

Iowa

29

0.91

9.1%

Y

410

12.85

New Mexico

20

0.94

16.2%

N

600

28.34

Oklahoma

40

1.01

13.2%

Y

400

10.10

Illinois

131

1.02

9.2%

Y

1,180

9.21

Michigan

106

1.05

10.6%

Y

1,410

13.99

Maine

15

1.10

10%

Y

220

16.15

Rhode Island

13

1.18

8.8%

Y

-

-

 

* Surgeons include those employed by ASCs, hospitals and other organizations; ophthalmologists are not included in these figures. The Bureau of Labor Statistics did not include surgeon employment data for Rhode Island.

** List of states includes the District of Columbia.

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