Interstate Medical License Compact to make physicians practicing in multiple states easier: 6 things to know

Written by Laura Dyrda | February 14, 2017 | Print  |

According to AAP News & Journals, a new regulation is making it easier for physicians to practice across state lines.

The Interstate Medical Licensure Compact is designed to streamline the licensure process for physicians attempting to practice in multiple states. Here are five things to know:

1. Eighteen states enacted laws and five states introduced legislation allowing physicians to participate in the compact as of Jan. 18. The 18 participating states are:

• Alabama
• Arizona
• Colorado
• Iowa
• Illinois
• Kansas
• Minnesota
• Missouri
• Montana
• New Hampshire
• Nevada
• Pennsylvania
• South Dakota
• Utah
• Wisconsin
• West Virginia
• Wyoming

The five states with legislation introduced are Arkansas, Michigan, Nebraska, North Dakota and Washington.

2. Two voting representatives from each state sit on the commission and members develop and enforce rules as well as issue advisory opinions.

3. Physicians who want to practice in multiple states will designate one state as their principle practice site and select additional states where they will seek licensure. Participating physicians must have unrestricted, full licenses in the primary state, which should be where the physician resides and accounts for at least 25 percent of their medical practice. The primary state can also be the state of the physician's employer.

4. Among participating states, the primary state would verify the physician's existing license and eligibility and provide credentialing information to the commission for physicians to receive licenses in additional states. Physicians are responsible for paying fees for the additional state licenses.

5. State medical boards will still have the authority over the physician's practice of medicine and can issue disciplinary actions.

6. The compact allows physicians to have license in the state where the patient is, which can make a big difference for physicians administering telehealth across state lines. Pediatricians can also access subspecialists or surgical specialists in other states for care assistance.

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