8 tips from an expert panel on transitioning into the ASC administrator role

The role of administrator is upheld by those with both managerial and clinical backgrounds. When someone steps into the role and shoulders the responsibilities that come along with it, there will always be learning and adjusting to do.

An expert panel at the Becker's ASC 22nd Annual Meeting — The Business and Operations of ASCs, discussed the ins and outs of making this transition from a variety of perspectives.

The panel consisted of Bridget Panco, RN, administrator for Vineland, N.J.-based Ambulatory Care Center; Brien Fausone, administrator for Farmington Hills-based Michigan Endoscopy Center and Jill Thrasher, administrator for Baylor Surgicare at North Dallas. The panel was moderated by Sandra Jones, senior vice president and COO for ASD management.

Here are eight tips from the panel on stepping into the role of ASC administrator.

1. Reach out to and build peer relationships with other administrators in the industry. Many of them will become valuable mentors to you.

2. Educate yourself by attending administrative conferences and enrolling in administrative courses, in addition to any relevant courses you have the time to take. Learning about anything from management to infection control will have a meaningful impact when it comes to running an ASC.

3. Learn to "get the bill out the door." Sometimes new administrators step into their role and the right systems to keep the gears moving are not in place. Really doing the work when you start to ensure claims are being moved out and revenues are coming in, and monitoring the timeline for both, is critical.

4. For those entering an administrator role from a clinical background, building strong relationships with front office individuals, particularly office managers, will be an insight into the areas where you likely need to do some catching up and can also help you to determine if things are being run correctly. Ensuring that your collector is doing their job effectively is vitally important.

5. Be proactive about bridging gaps between groups of care team members. The medical group needs to understand it's not just about them and vice versa for other staff members. Creating that culture of openness will contribute to a family mentality and reduce turnover.

6. If stepping into the position from a non-clinical background, doing all that you can to dig into the clinical side will be of benefit. Learning about quality and infection control can turn you into a resource for employees — you'll have the answers for them when they come to you. Spending time with your surgeons or your materials managers and seeing their daily challenges will demonstrate your commitment to running a cohesive operation and will shed light on where there might be problems.

7. Make organization a priority. Oftentimes when taking over an administrative role there will be loose ends to look out for. Blending the front and back of the office together so staff understand and respect the roles and responsibilities of others improves the patient experience.

8. Listen to your staff and determine what needs they have that aren't being met. Addressing scheduling inefficiencies or complaints and incentivizing different staff members, be they physicians or office workers, to improve performance in their respective positions will improve reimbursements and increase revenues.

8 tips from an expert panel on transitioning into the ASC administrator role

 

The role of administrator is upheld by those with both managerial and clinical backgrounds. When someone steps into the role and shoulders the responsibilities that come along with it, there will always be learning and adjusting to do.

 

An expert panel at the Becker's ASC 22nd Annual Meeting — The Business and Operations of ASCs, discussed the ins and outs of making this transition from a variety of perspectives.

 

The panel consisted of Bridget Panco, RN, administrator for Vineland, N.J.-based Ambulatory Care Center; Brien Fausone, administrator for Farmington Hills-based Michigan Endoscopy Center and Jill Thrasher, administrator for Baylor Surgicare at North Dallas. The panel was moderated by Sandra Jones, senior vice president and COO for ASD management.

 

Here are eight tips from the panel on stepping into the role of ASC administrator.

 

1. Reach out to and build peer relationships with other administrators in the industry. Many of them will become valuable mentors to you.

 

2. Educate yourself by attending administrative conferences and enrolling in administrative courses, in addition to any relevant courses you have the time to take. Learning about anything from management to infection control will have a meaningful impact when it comes to running an ASC.

 

3. Learn to "get the bill out the door." Sometimes new administrators step into their role and the right systems to keep the gears moving are not in place. Really doing the work when you start to ensure claims are being moved out and revenues are coming in, and monitoring the timeline for both, is critical.

 

4. For those entering an administrator role from a clinical background, building strong relationships with front office individuals, particularly office managers, will be an insight into the areas where you likely need to do some catching up and can also help you to determine if things are being run correctly. Ensuring that your collector is doing their job effectively is vitally important.

 

5. Be proactive about bridging gaps between groups of care team members. The medical group needs to understand it's not just about them and vice versa for other staff members. Creating that culture of openness will contribute to a family mentality and reduce turnover.

 

6. If stepping into the position from a non-clinical background, doing all that you can to dig into the clinical side will be of benefit. Learning about quality and infection control can turn you into a resource for employees — you'll have the answers for them when they come to you. Spending time with your surgeons or your materials managers and seeing their daily challenges will demonstrate your commitment to running a cohesive operation and will shed light on where there might be problems.

 

7. Make organization a priority. Oftentimes when taking over an administrative role there will be loose ends to look out for. Blending the front and back of the office together so staff understand and respect the roles and responsibilities of others improves the patient experience.

 

8. Listen to your staff and determine what needs they have that aren't being met. Addressing scheduling inefficiencies or complaints and incentivizing different staff members, be they physicians or office workers, to improve performance in their respective positions will improve reimbursements and increase revenues.

 

 

 

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