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Patient Safety Tool: Falls Prevention Checklist From CNA HealthPro

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CNA HealthPro, a provider of professional liability insurance for healthcare providers and organizations, has published a new resource to help ambulatory-based facilities learn how to reduce patient falls, which includes an extensive checklist an organization can use to assess its fall prevention efforts.

 

The resource, titled, "Patient Falls: Assessing Risk, Reducing Injury," provides strategies to reduce and document falls within ambulatory care settings.

 

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The checklist asks organizations to assess their performance in seven areas:

  1. Educating staff
  2. Evaluating, identifying and informing patients
  3. Obtaining and documenting patient histories
  4. Protecting patients in examination and treatment areas
  5. Maintaining a safe environment
  6. Creating safer living spaces for home care clients
  7. Documenting fall-related injuries

 

Download the CNA HealthPro resource on patient falls prevention (pdf), which includes the checklist on p. 2-4, for use in your facility.

 

Note: View our database providing 115-plus reports that link to free, downloadable and adaptable tools for use in surgery centers, hospitals and other organizations by clicking here.

 

Related Articles on Patient Falls:

Joint Commission Releases Animated Patient Safety Video Focusing on Falls Prevention

Amerinet Releases New Educational Toolkits on Patient Falls, Bed Bugs

Guidance for Preventing Patient Falls: Insight From Dr. Jack Egnatinsky of AAAHC

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