6 Statistics on CRNA and Nurse Anesthetist Compensation and Employment

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Here are six statistics on CRNAs and nurse anesthetists, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists' Fiscal Year 2009 AANA Practice Profile and Demographic Surveys & Database.


1. The average CRNA salary is $182,000. Here is a breakdown of CRNA salaries by percentile:
•    25th percentile — $150,000
•    Median — $180,000
•    75th percentile — $218,000
•    90th percentile — $250,000

2. Most CRNAs (86 percent) indicate a hospital as their primary practice setting. Here is breakdown of the percent of CRNAs employed in other practice settings:
•    ASC — 11 percent
•    Office-based — 1 percent
•    All other — 1 percent

3. Of CRNAs practicing at hospitals, 61.8 percent indicate practicing at only one hospital. Here is a breakdown of the percent of CRNAs practicing at multiple hospitals:
•    Two hospitals — 18.5 percent
•    Three hospitals — 7.2 percent
•    Four hospitals — 2.2 percent
•    Five or more hospitals — 2.5 percent

4. A large majority of CRNAs are employed by an anesthesia group (36 percent) or by a hospital (36 percent). Here is a breakdown of the percent of CRNAs employed by other employer types:
•    Independent contractor — 14 percent
•    Employee in other setting — 7 percent
•    Owner/partner — 4 percent
•    Military/government/VA — 3 percent

5. The majority of CRNAs (81 percent) work full-time (35 or more hours per week); 15 percent work part-time, 3 percent are retired and 1 percent are unemployed.

4. The average CRNA is 48.6 years old. Here is a breakdown of the percent of CNRAs by age range:

•    Under 30 — 2 percent
•    30-34 — 10 percent
•    35-39 — 13 percent
•    40-44 — 12 percent
•    45-49 — 13 percent
•    50-54 — 18 percent
•    55-59 — 17 percent
•    60-64 — 10 percent
•    65 and older — 5 percent

Learn more about the AANA.




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